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Cook Some Trash

Lara Rabinovitch

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anywhere

Diving into your dumpster (or someone else’s) may seem like a bit much, but before you chuck it, check it. Can you use those carrot tops for a salad? How about that turkey carcass for a soup? Maximize what you’ve got: braise your cauliflower stems, make a quick salsa with leftover herbs, or bake some bruised apples into a winter crumble. The world is more edible than you think. Here are 9 tips from Mother Nature Network on the Do's and Don'ts.

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  • vanillagrrl

    I think seeing Jacques Pepin's recipe for a gratin made with chard stems in
    Essential Pepin (and seeing how much he and other chefs abhor waste in the kitchen) is what started me thinking about all this. I have a freezer bag for collecting scraps to put in stews. Save Parmesan rinds. But potato peelings I don't know about -- don't the green parts have poisonous compounds? Be careful out there.

  • bpriga

    This is actually not a new concept. Just what you are calling it is novel. Although I really don't care for the use of the term "Trash". I get images of flies and maggots and awful odours. My family is from eastern europe. My mother said that throwing out food was not something that occurred. Everything was recycled one way or another. Stock was always made from the leftover bones and vegetable scraps. Beet green were eaten everything was used either for the animals or for the compost or for another meal. I have pretty much followed this tradition. Throwing out food is considered a sin. I have always considered the amount of food that restaurants discard to be disgusting. So it pleases me to read this article and see that there is an attempt to show food more respect. Cheers.