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    Jessica De Jesus Zachary Slobig Angela Bertrand

Do You Have the Latest Glass Rectangle Yet?

Dave Burdick

"There is a term for all of this: 'planned obsolescence,' which was popularized in the 1950s by Brooks Stevens, an industrial designer who specialized in making new cars. Briskly adopted by postwar consumer goods industries, the strategy coaxed Americans to sell their 1955 Cadillacs for the 1956 Cadillacs with their pronounced tail fins, and then the 1957s with even more exaggerated fins, and then ’58s, ’59s and so on."

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3 people think this is good

    Jessica De Jesus Zachary Slobig Angela Bertrand

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  • derunderun

    I will always appreciate efforts to call on planned and perceived obsolescence. It is not acceptable that products are being built with breaking down soon and no longer worthy in mind. There are still many people who are not aware of this basic business tactic and accept it for what it is. Spreading the word to change how customers see it is the first step.