Discover and share stories

of adventure, connection, and change making.

3 people think this is good

  • Amy Knutson
  • Alessandra Rizzotti

How To: Make Your Home Into a Riddle

Andrew

First, be a little mad. We have all been working on this for some time now, so this should not be difficult. Second, design physical puzzles throughout the house. The more perplexing, the better. Third, let the children out of their cage and inspire their young imagination. Fourth, if anyone asks why you did this, say it is as necessary as the kitchen sink or toilet. Finally, although you may be tempted, do not incorporate a Minotaur in your home. They are not housebroken and drink too much.

Continue to nytimes.com

Inappropriate?

3 people think this is good

  • Amy Knutson
  • Alessandra Rizzotti

This post is tagged in…

Discuss

  1. {{attachment.file.name}}

Ready to post! You’ve uploaded the maximum number of images.

Oops! Nice pic, but it’s just not our (file) type. Please try uploading a .jpg or .png image.

Well, this is embarrassing. Something went wrong when posting your comment. Care to try again?

That image is too large. Maximum size is 6MB.

Posting comment...

  • Alessandra Rizzotti

    I love the idea of hiding mementos in the walls- and making your space a place of exploration. It makes life more exciting. Relationships that are successful usually work this way- there's always something new to discover- or else it gets dry and dated.

    • Andrew

      As a kid, this is what I wanted -- to be forever walking around solving some riddle or mystery. I blame Indiana Jones, spending the first five years of life in a big old house, and a wild imagination. I agree with you though, in regard to relationships and other things, that mystery keeps people interested.