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  • Alessandra Rizzotti

    I would love to study plant neurobiology. I notice how plants respond in different ways to varying things I add to my compost heap- but the idea of a plant having senses and being able to respond to sound/have emotions is so interesting. This is my favorite part of this article: "The “sessile life style,” as plant biologists term it, calls for an extensive and nuanced understanding of one’s immediate environment, since the plant has to find everything it needs, and has to defend itself, while remaining fixed in place." Imagine if we were all fixed in place- and we didn't have to move around all the time- imagine how connected we'd be to our surroundings- maybe we'd respect the environment more?

    • Alessandra Rizzotti

      This section is also incredible: "Mancuso thinks we’re willing to accept artificial intelligence because computers are our creations, and so reflect our own intelligence back at us. They are also our dependents, unlike plants: “If we were to vanish tomorrow, the plants would be fine, but if the plants vanished . . .” Our dependence on plants breeds a contempt for them, Mancuso believes. In his somewhat topsy-turvy view, plants “remind us of our weakness.”