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    Angela  Zollinger Kathy Goddu Lindsey Smith Zachary Slobig SirSchwartz

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  • Kathy GodduKathy Goddu

    These sculptures are so beautiful and tell a wonderful story of creativity, functionality, survival, and the zen of letting go. In another breath it is quite grotesque. It demonstrates the great amount of waste we American produce, put into landfills and think nothing of it. "Out of site, out of mind": that's the understanding of object permanence that a 2 year old has! However, the homeless people that took up residence here used objects they found to create a home and much more. The creative artistic minds of these people recycled the waste, trash, and debris into things of beauty, contemplation, and statements. These pieces of art should give us all pause regarding what we are doing and using day to day. Pause about the waste we create without thought or concern for the environment and our children's future. Pause as to how we treat those who aren't as fortunate as others and end up homeless. Although we can all recognize that there is no permanence in this life; "everything must die"..... there is permanence of trash and waste. It doesn't break down in the soil. We can bulldoze it under, but years from now it will come back up! It does pollute soil, water, air, food and animals. These sculptures and those who created them were most likely "trashed" for a condo society....."Waste not, want not." We are not a disposable society. We need and must take care of each other. I hope these people who were displaced were given an appropriate place to live. One they wanted. Sorry for the rant, but it seems we forget how sacred the earth and its inhabitants are.