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  • Lisa Dawson
  • Shay Delagarza
  • Rebecca Wu
  • Heather Swift
  • Frankenstina
  • Jared Moscow
  • Michelle Cruz

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  • naulston

    Interesting idea. a general problem with the current trends in urban planning is the lack of revisiting old trends that no longer serve our needs. It could be the design of highways, affordable housing, prisons or the streetscape. Maybe we have to revisit the plans that we've constructed as they shift our behavior and we may have better solutions now than we did in the past.

  • Jeff Jones

    Sylvester Stallone can break out of any prison...

  • dtkeyx

    Don't want to be too nitpicky, but Pelican Bay is in the northWESTERN corner of the state, not the northeastern.
    Otherwise interesting article.

  • Jerry Frendo

    Why is an individual in solitary? Possesion of contraband (drugs, shank), throwing feces/urine at a guard, fighting? I doubt many solitary inmates are there because of some injustice.They broke the rules. Perhaps hard labor is more humane than solitary? Do the taxpayers want to pay for the extra guards to watch the chain gang? International human rights? Like Russian prisons?

    • Zolfar Hassib

      Exactly " why is an individual in solitary" when solitary is considered cruel and unusual punishment. It is against the constitution if you ask any psychologist. " i doubt many solitary inmates are there because of some injustice" is not really the greatest argument to present when there are facts out that infact reasoning to going into solitary can be as arbitrary as greeting "the wrong person" or not cleaning a cell. Do the taxpayers want to continue paying the 67% return rates US prisoners have after a 3 year exit? I doubt it. Better start thinking of other solutions, because evidently what it is now is going to harm more than do good.

    • Zolfar Hassib

      Exactly " why is an individual in solitary" when solitary is considered cruel and unusual punishment. It is against the constitution if you ask any psychologist. " i doubt many solitary inmates are there because of some injustice" is not really the greatest argument to present when there are facts out that infact reasoning to going into solitary can be as arbitrary as greeting "the wrong person" or not cleaning a cell. Do the taxpayers want to continue paying the 67% return rates US prisoners have after a 3 year exit? I doubt it. Better start thinking of other solutions, because evidently what it is now is going to harm more than do good.

    • jdat747

      Perhaps you should be reminded that you unknowingly commit an average of 3 felonies every day of your life. Any good federal prosecutor who is able to find out everything about you can convince a jury of 12 to put you in prison. Times are no different than when Jesus said, "Let him who is without fault cast the first stone."

      • Jerry Frendo

        That holds for you as well. You had better pray to Jesus you don't end up as my cellmate. I'll take your money and your snacks and your new Nikes and if you snitch I'll take more than that!

        • jdat747

          lol, I'm the type to request solitary just to avoid that nonsense

    • Raphael Sperry

      That's a good question. Unfortunately, the State of California doesn't always have a good answer. If you read into the story, you will find many cases of people spending decades in solitary for "gang affiliation" consisting of possession of artwork or secret testimony from other prisoners. One of they key demands of the hunger strikers is not to end all forms of prison discipline, but rather that actual bad behavior be used as the criterion for punishment, not simple association or willfully interpreted "intelligence."

      • Jerry Frendo

        If the gangs are ultimately allowed to form then the ultimate outcome, more murders, assaults on guards and other prisoners will have to be controlled another way than solitary. These guys are not kindergarten students, they will take advantage of any weakness afforded to them. Chain gang? Inhumane? Or let the real bad ones out in the general pop and see what happens. I already know. More assaults/murders on guards and other gang members. Pardon me (no pun intended) but my sympathy for child molesters and rapists and murderers is non-existent.

        • _Glenn_

          People are put into the segregated housing unit -- solitary confinement, for as simple a thing as ordering the "wrong" book from the library system.

  • dpdmail

    They call it prison for a reason. The only tragedy is when innocent people are imprisoned.

    That is something we should be concerned with.

    • _Glenn_

      If that is 'the only tragedy' it happens enough that it is worth your while to become informed on how frequently it happens and how it could happen to you.

      • dpdmail

        A precise accounting of that would be difficult since most inmates claim innocence.....loudly, but I think I understand what you are trying to convey, namely that our court systems are imperfect. And yes, avoiding prison is a good life strategy.

    • joannefilm

      "They call it prison for a reason." What reason is that? What are you implying by this sentence? I have absolutely no problem with criminals being given sentences in accordance with their crimes. That is not what we are discussing here. What we are discussing is that solitary confinement for years and years is torture. Serving a regular prison sentence and being tortured are two separate issues.

      • dpdmail

        No one receives fair treatment in prison. It's best to avoid going there.

        And by my standard, being in prison––any part of a prison––is torture. That would include working there.

        • loulou59

          Yes, it is torture working in that place.

        • joannefilm

          I am not talking about your standards of torture. I am talking about actual torture.

    • Sasha Shepherd

      I agree. Because the point is just to maximize punishment for its own sake, why not every week cut off a finger? Give them painful diseases while in just to increase their suffering?

      Why not cut their ears off. That would really show them.

      With enough punishment, you can totally solve the problem of crime. That is what America has taught us over the last 100 years.

    • Raphael Sperry

      Indeed prison conditions are matters for general concern. However, when guilty people are treated below the minimum standards of international human rights that is also a tragedy, not just for the victim but for the perpetrator. If human rights do not apply to the guilty then they do nothing to protect the innocent. And when our government degrades and tortures our guilty fellow citizens, it degrades our whole country.