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Argo Naught

It's not about me.

I am good at equivocating, but only sometimes.

Location
Washington

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  • Argo Naught replied to a comment by Argo Naught

    The Post-BCS Game Question: Why Not Athlete and Academic? via magazine.good.is

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    Argo Naught3 months ago

    By posing the question, I'm suggesting that the structure of the athletic-academic program at colleges may not be the sole cause (or even the primary cause) for a lower graduation rate and lower academic success among this one specific group (black male student athletes). We should take a hard look not only at how they are perceived and treated on campus, but how they are perceived and treated at home, as well.

    I'm not implying that black families don't encourage their children, but I think it's possible that, for example, a black male child with a proficiency at football might be very much encouraged (by family, by coaches, by community even) to focus on that skill in order to secure a scholarship, and that encouragement for other things (including academics) may still be there but take a distant second place. Continuing with that example, if that child then has grades which start to slip, but discovers that a lot of folks are willing to minimize that or let it slide, then I suspect that has a detrimental effect on the building up of a personal sense of responsibility.

    Argo Naught3 months ago

    My last sentence got left off while I was trying to sign in and post. Basically, I finished up by saying that perhaps the example I gave isn't typical or common at all, or perhaps it is -- I honestly don't know from personal experience. However, I think it's worth asking the question and examining the issue from every possible angle.

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  • Argo Naught replied to a comment by Liz Dwyer

    The Post-BCS Game Question: Why Not Athlete and Academic? via magazine.good.is

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    Liz Dwyer3 months ago

    When you say "Most students in college aren't athletes, and their motivation to succeed is fueled by factors such as family encouragement, a sense of responsibility and social expectations, as well as the plain necessity that will arise once they graduate and need to support themselves. Is it possible that black male students are missing some or all of these same motivators?" are you saying that black families don't encourage, and that black students don't have a sense of responsibility or social expecations, etc?

    Argo Naught3 months ago

    By posing the question, I'm suggesting that the structure of the athletic-academic program at colleges may not be the sole cause (or even the primary cause) for a lower graduation rate and lower academic success among this one specific group (black male student athletes). We should take a hard look not only at how they are perceived and treated on campus, but how they are perceived and treated at home, as well.

    I'm not implying that black families don't encourage their children, but I think it's possible that, for example, a black male child with a proficiency at football might be very much encouraged (by family, by coaches, by community even) to focus on that skill in order to secure a scholarship, and that encouragement for other things (including academics) may still be there but take a distant second place. Continuing with that example, if that child then has grades which start to slip, but discovers that a lot of folks are willing to minimize that or let it slide, then I suspect that has a detrimental effect on the building up of a personal sense of responsibility.

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  • Argo Naught commented on a link

    The Post-BCS Game Question: Why Not Athlete and Academic? via magazine.good.is

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    Argo Naught3 months ago

    Your article is thought-provoking and highlights a number of problems with the current state of the college system with regard to the dichotomy between academics and athletics, particularly as it relates to black men, so thank you for addressing the issue. However, your call to action is disproportionately placed on college institutions when more of it should be placed on black male students themselves. In fact, you place almost no responsibility or expectations on those students at all until the final paragraph of your article, despite the fact that by the time they are in college, both the responsibility and the incentive to secure their future rests primarily on their own shoulders.

    Most students in college aren't athletes, and their motivation to succeed is fueled by factors such as family encouragement, a sense of responsibility and social expectations, as well as the plain necessity that will arise once they graduate and need to support themselves. Is it possible that black male students are missing some or all of these same motivators?

    Perhaps instead of only looking in one direction and focusing exclusively on a retooling of the college system and way of thinking which goes along with it, we should consider that the problems with the undergrad performance and low graduation rates of black men don't occur in an academic vacuum. I agree that we should take a hard look at colleges and consider what can be improved there, and we should do the same with the K-12 school system as well; however, we also need to consider what these students are and are not getting from their family and community while growing up. Simply addressing the issues with "American culture" as it pertains to academics, entertainment, and more, does not solve the problem, and building a collegiate framework which is geared toward ensuring academic achievement has little to no hope of producing results if these students don't already have the tools to succeed long before they step onto a college campus.

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  • Argo Naught replied to a comment by Nathaniel Fisher

    Six Ways Technology is Making You Sick, and One Solution via magazine.good.is

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    Nathaniel Fisher9 months ago

    This is simply marketing. "Get offline by using our online service." This post isn't even worth my explanation to be honest. Slanting people who use technology as more likely to develop depression, ever thought it was the other way round? Especially with young people.

    Argo Naught9 months ago

    The marketing component is certainly there, but so are the concise bullet points (with relevant links giving evidence) of certain dangers to be aware of involved with staying connected via technology for lengthy periods of time.

    To answer your question, no - I've never thought it was the other way around in terms of young people being depressed by not using technology enough. If you're floating that as an alternate theory, then please provide some evidence, such as was provided in this piece to support each assertion in their list.

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    The Emancipation Proclamation Story That Should Be Taught in Schools via magazine.good.is

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  • Argo Naught thinks this is good

    People Are Awesome: This Guy Returned a lost iPad, $13,000 Cash, and then His Reward via nbcnews.com

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