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Auntiegrav

“Whatever you are, be a good one.”
— Abraham Lincoln

I am good at giving a damn.

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  • Auntiegrav commented on a link

    The Rise of Temporality in Business via magazine.good.is

    7

    Auntiegravabout 1 month ago

    From the discussion of a "Good" standpoint, I think this should go in the direction of how the Scarcity effect causes anxiety. Modern consumerism is basically about two things: separating people from each other and then separating them from their money. I recommend anyone interested in this subject read "Coercion: Why we do what They say" by Douglas Rushkoff.
    Human intentionality isn't all it's cracked up to be. More and more research is showing how easy it is to manipulate people, how we can't predict what our future self will actually like (hence, the closets full of clothes we never wear), and how much money is spent manipulating the flow of activity toward consumption. (There's a big difference between Capitalism and Consumerism: yet people believe that anything that reduces consumption is "communist" or "socialist").
    I'm hoping that a lot of people will take time to think about this, but it's more likely that they "don't have an App for that".
    The part of the brain that allows intentionality is very weak and small, and it works best in cooperation with other people. Unfortunately, the more people connect through technology, the easier it is to manipulate their intentions by manipulating the biases through that technology. The promises of individualism are false. If you don't believe so, look around and see how many people don't know the difference between liberty and ass-hattery. The TV and Internet is full of them.

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  • Auntiegrav commented on a link

    Want Students to Speak Up About Injustice? Teach Them About Youth Who Fought For Free Speech via magazine.good.is

    Auntiegravabout 1 month ago

    Thank you. One more sentence to finish the thought on the Gulf of Tonkin incident would be nice, though: It was later determined to be a false flag incident (the Navy ship was not fired upon), and the biggest motivation of the Vietnam War was pro-war business interests under the guise of anti-communism.
    An additional point could be made for the class-based demographics of the war, where rich kids got college deferments and poor kids (black and white) fought and died the most.
    Protests against the war were as much based on the class aspects as any political ideologies.

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  • Auntiegrav commented on a link

    How Parenting My Father is One Step Towards Changemaking via magazine.good.is

    Auntiegrav2 months ago

    Thank you for your efforts and for writing about it. As this Empire consumes all of the physical resources, it also consumes its own people. That's when you know it's going to die like all of the other empires. The class war between the super-rich and everyone else will continue as long as the majority believe they are in some mythical Middle class, immune from these problems. Stories like yours help to explain to people that there can be no escape: at least not for long. For every "job creator" like Romney, there are a million people like your dad who wouldn't be a burden if they were simply included in a healthy society. We don't have a healthy society (physically, mentally or politically). It's just a rats nest of prejudices, fear and hoarding of resources.

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  • Auntiegrav commented on a link

    A 13-Year-Old's Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School via magazine.good.is

    Auntiegrav2 months ago

    What Jada misses (because of her inexperience only) is that if she DOES get "educated" the same as the white teachers did, she will simply become a slave of a different master: money and the System of systems. As long as people of color are poor and unmoderated, they are more free to take risks that white people are afraid to take. Every society starts with people finding their OWN common needs and strengths. The only societies that begin by getting educated by another society become either assimilated, enslaved or oppressed. Of the three, the first is the most heinous.

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  • Auntiegrav commented on a link

    Are Humans Out of Place in the Modern World? via magazine.good.is

    6

    Auntiegrav2 months ago

    Evolution is two main parts: random mutation and natural selection. It isn't the "modern" world per se, but civilization (city-based living) that is the culprit. The whole point to civilization is to isolate humans from natural risks (natural selection). The human is too easily taught to conform to civilization and too quick to discard the fringe among us who are already adapted to the new environment.
    In addition, most species are a functional part of their environment: contributing as a resource to the future of that environment. Civilization has allowed humans to be isolated from the feedback mechanisms (predators and threats) and to invent the various beliefs that collectively are Humanist: they place humanity on a pedestal without humanity actually doing anything but extract resources from the environment and their own future (debt).
    We shouldn't worry so much about humans being adapted to civilized life: we SHOULD be worried about civilization being adapted to the world's needs.

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  • Auntiegrav commented on a link

    If We Want to Overcome Extreme Poverty, We Must Change This  via magazine.good.is

    Auntiegrav2 months ago

    "Buy The Locust Effect February 2-8"
    I received this post on February 10th.
    Like most things in the "civilized" world, the lack of justice is not political in that no amount of intentionality of politicians will really change the situation to a large degree. Why? Because the only votes in the globalized economy that count are the monetary ones. Our human race has separated itself from the natural world it evolved in and created something called "civilization". The basic tenet of civilization is to remove human beings from the risks of the natural world and as such, isolates us from the reality of natural resources. The people left behind are those who can be exploited to extract resources and pass them up the ladder to those who own civilization's rulemaking (read: economics). Until humanity realizes that those closest to our natural resources represent the future of the planet (by whether they are caring for resources or extracting from them), those people will be treated like the dirt on their clothes. They are devalued because they are being consumed along with the soil, oceans and climate stability that allowed the bullies of civilization (the mean Mean) to thrive and become pretentious enough to believe that "civilized people" are somehow acting with intention and generosity.
    Of all the -isms that our philosophers throw around and talking heads claim to be "evil" or "sacred", the one that they do not touch is Consumerism.
    Humans are consumers of their own future because we isolate ourselves from the risks that moderate consumption (disease, predators, etc). We have become so good at consuming that only consumption of the biosphere itself will be noticed, and that only now that it is too late.

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  • Auntiegrav commented on a link

    How Questioning My Role in Journalism Led Me to Bravery Tapes via magazine.good.is

    28

    Auntiegrav3 months ago

    Thanks. This is what I come to GOOD for.

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  • Auntiegrav commented on a link

    How I'm Living a Life By Design via magazine.good.is

    25

    Auntiegrav3 months ago

    Very nice.
    My cynical attitude, however, is that at an age over 50, I can't take seriously when someone says "That bad year I had" and it was only 3 or 4 years ago.
    I got divorced when I was 24, and people would ask "Why?". I would reply, "I was young and stupid back then."
    I look forward to hearing about your growth in the years to come and how much MORE you will learn, as well as the setbacks you will endure along the way. Not because of spite or belittling, but you appear to be someone who will take those things and make them into something great.
    Maybe I'll write a book of the end-all explanation of the Meaning of Life, God, and the Universe one day, but for the time being, I'm still doing the research.
    Good luck with yours.

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  • Auntiegrav thinks this is good

    How I'm Living a Life By Design via magazine.good.is

    25

  • Auntiegrav replied to a comment by Georges Herman

    Where have all the Parisian farmers gone? via magazine.good.is

    10

    Georges Herman3 months ago

    Dear Auntiegrav,
    You make many good points, yet I think you lack of optimism regarding what we can do as consumers. Rather than complaining that only industrial food is affordable, we can invest our own money, time and community strength to find cheaper ways for healthy sustainable food.

    But first let me tell you that I only eat extremely good Terrroir food from nearby Paris, which I cook myself. My average food bill is 200€ a month. I'm 22, I'm almost vegetarian (meat once every 1 or 2 month?). I usually always have 7 kinds of cheese around at home, all made and conditionned at the farm : life is a real treat. Moreover I know who (or I know someone who knows) makes my food directly. And I didn't even have any relative or personal friend close to being a farmer to start with : I'm a good old city boy.
    There are many ways one can cut down on their spendings while improving the quality of their food. All it takes is awareness, education, and commitment. And that I think is the main obstacle.

    I'll share one tool here : http://www.laruchequiditoui.fr

    If you can't read french, what it says is buy good local food directly from local farmers, at a neighbour's house, once a week. Or better, be that neighbour and organize the food sales !

    It's 2 years old and already has 400 users who organize food sales, some 60,000 users buying food, and I don't know how many local farmers, winemakers etc. They take total 16.5% commission from farmers sales (half for the reseller, half for the company that runs this service).

    I do not know if they manage to make a profit but I know they had a major recent capital increase.

    Auntiegrav3 months ago

    Thanks for the reply, Georges. I will be the first to admit I sound cynical. I do work with CSA farms to try and help them function with reasonably priced technical support on their machines, and I have been a market farmer off and on for a decade or so. I was trying to lay out the reality of how the best food has become a luxury item because no matter how much we WISH everyone had access to better food, the Consumerist (as different from capitalist) system feeds on keeping people too busy to contribute to their own well being. Much of the decision-making power of the world today is in the industrial north, where food is almost always transported and processed by design. Fresh foods have to be grown under plastic/glass or shipped long distances. Rarely is there a direct-from-farm choice that doesn't go through massively regulated and profit-based distribution in order to take advantage of the efficiencies of scale.
    I agree with you but if we get too optimistic, we lose track of the daily grind that is required to maintain the few direct links to the land that we have now. By calling it a luxury, I'm hoping people will realize how special what we have is, and how much work is yet to be done to take a luxury and make it available to the masses of people who need it. We need small scale food supports from politicians. We need small scale food support from manufacturers like John Deere, CNH, Microsoft and others. We need cooperation from municipalities on taxes, promotion, regulations and zoning, in order to get to a point where most of the people have a link to nature that doesn't go through a high-priced and gated corporate road between civilization and the land. We can't keep forcing small farmers to compete against each other for the bottom of the value barrel. They hold the future of the world in their hands, yet we treat them like dirt in the economy. The ones that are successful find a luxury niche to fill, but how long can we keep telling young aspiring farmers that they have to sacrifice every minute of their day in order to barely pay for the land they rent? Wage slavery is still slavery, even if the people think they are doing "good".

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  • Auntiegrav commented on a link

    Where have all the Parisian farmers gone? via magazine.good.is

    10

    Auntiegrav3 months ago

    Efficiency.
    Take it any way you want (Kunstler says "Efficiency is the straightest road to Hell."), but France's protectionist culture has kept farmers' markets alive much longer than could be expected, probably because luxury and tourism are a mainstay of their economic system. In today's world of petrofood, real food diversity is a luxury: paid on the back of a petroleum economic and farming system. The high prices it takes to be a market farmer can only be paid by people who are not 'average' consumers and workers. Sure, we can say that the average income is enough to afford the food, but the average workday doesn't allow for the time investment to prepare the food, or the education required to know how.
    The 'civilized' ways we have developed to produce food are the result of civilization itself. Walled cities protect people from the risks of growing their own food, and empower the merchantmen to establish profitable systems of systems, where calories are sourced on the cheap and sold with propaganda and packaging as "value-added" items.
    The idea that a farmer provides food directly to a consumer has been obsolete for quite some time. The farmers market model will expand and contract as any luxury product does: based on fads and advertising. The "local food movement" is an advertising method, not an organic development because people need it. If the economy allows it, people will seek expensive food, and if the communication is maintained, they will try to be fair about it, but unless cultures and scientific house elves can convince the Imperial governments to subsidize local foods rather than cheap fodder for the processing lobby, direct farm marketing will remain a fringe luxury.

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  • Auntiegrav replied to a comment by Tom Maybrier

    A City Education: Students Will Stop Saying 'That's Gay' and 'Retarded' if Adults Quit, Too via magazine.good.is

    28

    Tom Maybrier3 months ago

    Live my stereotype and enjoy it? What? I'm sorry, but no. Just no.

    I will live as a human being and take offense when a word tied to my identity is used as a slur, to denigrate or make fun of anything - even poor taste in paint colors.

    I can handle criticism - In fact, I welcome it, but this logic is so flawed it makes my head spin.

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