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Beads Land-Trujillo

Social ergonomist with vision of technologies of propiqunity.

I am good at creatively computing, organizing spaces, and thinking beneath ideologies.

Location
New York, New York
Website
twitter.com/beadsland

Activity

  • Beads Land-Trujillo commented on a link

    How Co-Housing Could Help City Dwellers Afford a Place to Live via archdaily.com

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    Beads Land-Trujillo7 months ago

    Glad to see that developers are thinking outside the box that is a single-person flat. More than glad to hear that there are municipalities that are allowing this sort of experimentation with different architectures of living to happen.

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  • Beads Land-Trujillo thinks this is good

    How Co-Housing Could Help City Dwellers Afford a Place to Live via archdaily.com

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  • Beads Land-Trujillo thinks this is good

    Bike Share with built-in docking system via fastcoexist.com

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  • Beads Land-Trujillo commented on a link

    Bike Share with built-in docking system via fastcoexist.com

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    Beads Land-Trujillo7 months ago

    First off, "much needed parking spaces" kind of misses the objective of reducing the reliance on automobiles. Second, there aren't all that many bike corrals in New York City to begin with. So, they'd still need to installed. Either they go in parking spaces, or they go on sidewalks blocking pedestrian traffic.

    That this solution can use generic bike racks is probably good from a cost perspective, and would certainly ensure greater access and choice of where to leave shared bikes, but the bike racks would still need to be installed in public spaces, and that means those spaces won't be available for other purposes.

    Also, there may also be security issues if bikes are spread too thinly for program managers to monitor them--bikes chained to signposts by owners who subsequently abandoned them when they've come back to find both wheels missing are a common sight on the streets of our city.

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  • Beads Land-Trujillo replied to a comment by Adele Peters

    Stop Fearing, Start Thinking: The Fixperts Social Project via magazine.good.is

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    Adele Peters7 months ago

    I'll have to check out that book. And to bring it back to fixing and repair, beyond it being a manual activity, there's the added benefit of figuring out how something works...definitely a different kind of thinking than most of us engage in each day.

    Beads Land-Trujillo7 months ago

    Yes, that does seem to be the central Jeffersonian theme of this project. Being better citizens by being better informed about how our world works. That's a subtext of the Noclisi project also.

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  • Beads Land-Trujillo replied to a comment by Adele Peters

    Stop Fearing, Start Thinking: The Fixperts Social Project via magazine.good.is

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    Adele Peters7 months ago

    Interesting. Do you think those of us who use our hands for repetitive tasks like typing miss out on those benefits?

    Beads Land-Trujillo7 months ago

    Not at all. Touch typing (or even hunt-and-pecking) is a manual skill. That said, involving the eyes in coordinated activities would, I expect, add further benefit. Writing with a pen is a manual activity, but I'd guess that calligraphy was even more cognitively fulfilling, as a for instance.

    It is known that those who take their knitting or other needlework to conferences find they are able to process the information being presented better than if they were just sitting on their hands. Knitting can be at least as repetitive (if not more so) a task as working a computer keyboard.

    The benefit comes through the integration of motor and sensory processing. Remember the drawings of the two homunculi mapping parts of the body to the motor cortex and the somatosensory cortex.

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  • Beads Land-Trujillo commented on a link

    Stop Fearing, Start Thinking: The Fixperts Social Project via magazine.good.is

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    Beads Land-Trujillo7 months ago

    Am reminded of Frank R. Wilson's, "The Hand: How Its Use Shapes the Brain, Language, and Human Culture". Fixing, or indeed any manual task, engages the brain because it involves the organs that monopolize the largest share of our brain area.

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  • Beads Land-Trujillo thinks this is good

    Stop Fearing, Start Thinking: The Fixperts Social Project via magazine.good.is

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  • Beads Land-Trujillo thinks this is good

    Can We Build an Internet That's Not US-Centric? via vice.com

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  • Beads Land-Trujillo commented on a link

    Can We Build an Internet That's Not US-Centric? via vice.com

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    Beads Land-Trujillo7 months ago

    Given that the Internet protocols were designed with multiple routing paths not only anticipated, but intended, this seems like a no-brainer. Another way of thinking of this is that the global Internet backbone is not simply U.S. centric, it is also concentrated in the Northern hemisphere, as this map illustrates: http://global-internet-map-2012.telegeography.com/

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  • Beads Land-Trujillo replied to a comment by mbstrawn

    Win $5,000. Submit Your Idea About How To Improve Citizen And Government Interaction

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    mbstrawn7 months ago

    Hello,

    I find this question and contest really saddening. Why are we reinventing the wheel? The connection between citizens and government has always been Mayors - Governors - Legislatures - Representatives - Senators - President. These people in power should be making decisions based on their constituents. They should be having active and ongoing discussions with the people they represent. I see that as citizens working better with government because we would be more connected and information would flow more freely.

    Was this what the Founding Fathers had in mind? If so, when did the breakdown occur?

    Now this idea seems laughable because our culture and society is used to a government run a particular way, which so often is filled with corruption, false promises, and little work actually being completed. Our Civil Servants have strayed far far from their purpose...

    Any thoughts on this? Did I completely miss the purpose of this contest?

    Thanks,
    Mary Beth

    Beads Land-Trujillo7 months ago

    I'd argue that a large part of the breakdown is that the vast bulk of our political energies as a society are put into national offices, and very little of the attention of citizens goes to working with the mayors, town councilpersons, and special district board members that are closest to them and in the best position not only advocate on their constituents' behalfs at other hierarchical levels, but to actually act as brokers in coordinating the efforts of non-elected community leaders to enact change.

    I would imagine that our founders would be aghast at how enamored the public has become with national office-holders and how ignorant we tend to be about the operation of our own local governments.

    Robert Putnam, in Bowling Alone, gives some insight into how this has come to be the case, in that Americans are far less inclined to seek leadership roles in their own communities, or even to participate in groups whether political or otherwise, than only a few generations ago.

    The good thing about Code for America is that their focus is on local government, not national. Unfortunately, they are still working within the paradigm of government as institution providing services to constituents--rather than thinking of officers and appointees as citizens among others--and thus the technology solutions they promote tend to recapitulate the current imagined divide between government and public.

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  • Beads Land-Trujillo replied to a comment by Patrick McDonnell

    Win $5,000. Submit Your Idea About How To Improve Citizen And Government Interaction

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    Patrick McDonnell7 months ago

    Beads, thanks for your response. Now, I'm super curious to know what you ideas are?

    If you want to enter the contest or not it's up to you. Even if you don't, I think it's pretty cool to see what other people have already come up with. At the very least, participating in a collective community of people sharing their ideas is reward enough for me.

    Keep on thought'n!

    Beads Land-Trujillo7 months ago

    Perhaps I'll post something here on GOOD.is. It's has been a year or so since I last tried distilling these ideas into bite-size pieces.

    With respect to collective community, I agree, but in addition to the problems with the contest model, the ways we currently implement technologies of online collectivity are highly constrained and not terribly representative of how humans share and explore ideas in lived experience away from the Web. Those constraints are both conventional (they rely on normative technologies that organize how we relate through them in specific ways) and gendered (they reproduce conversational patterns and modes of discourse that favor less than half the population).

    If we want to really improve technology-mediated interaction between non-office-holder citizens and office-holder citizens, it must start by changing the forms those mediators take, not simply find new ways to repackage those very limited mediation forms. (And that, in turn, may require changing the paradigms with which we think about programming those mediators in the first place.)

    Consider the above two paragraphs a sneak peak encompassing no less than four radical breaks from conventional thought about politics and technology.

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