New Shared links now take you directly to the source!

All links shared by fellow members now take you directly to the source. Click on a video, something to do or a yellow comments icon and you’ll stay on GOOD.is. Living well and doing good just got faster!

Questions? help@goodinc.com

cindraleehenry

“Whatever you are, be a good one.”
— Abraham Lincoln

I am good at giving a damn.

Location
91403

Activity

  • cindraleehenry replied to a comment by john.kantor

    An Open Letter to President Obama from Bill Ayers via magazine.good.is

    105

    john.kantorover 1 year ago

    The real problem is that society doesn't value real education any more - only vocational training.

    cindraleehenryover 1 year ago

    In a way, yes. In a way, no. We are not even preparing our young people for useful, fulfilling vocations these days. Both well-rounded educational training and vocational training have suffered. The "skill" that has suffered the most, that is the most over-looked in either educational environment is the skill of critical thinking. More than anything, we need to teach people how to think for themselves, how to problem-solve, how to pursue knowledge for a lifetime. And we need to instill a thirst for knowledge. That most valuable skill does not appear anywhere in current educational reform rhetoric.

    Join the discussion

  • cindraleehenry replied to a comment by remo.cosentino

    An Open Letter to President Obama from Bill Ayers via magazine.good.is

    105

    remo.cosentinoover 1 year ago

    I couldn't agree more.

    As an immigrant of 8 from Italy, I was placed in the first grade of the local grammar school in Brooklyn, NY. There were no ESL programs: it was sink or swim with only my native intelligence and quiet behaviour to see me through. But there was more: dedicated teachers, accepting fellow students. I seamlessly became part of the class and hardly aware that my mode of communication became English and not Italian.

    It wasn't always untroubled; gradually I became just another student and no longer the "other". This was the ducational system in New York in the Forties: we learned geography and numbers, music and drawing, and most of all reading. We received the skills to advance: plan and paint a ten-foot mural about other cultures, write a school play and act and sing in it. Did we have tests? I suppose so, but it was not traumatic. Eventually, I went from the sixth grade to the the seventh and eight grade: the emphasis was to make us aware of as much as possible. Few of us were expected to go to college after high school, if we finished high school. But some of us did. We not only complet High School but went on to College: for me a BA and another degree in Fine Art. There were none of the "race to the top" programs, or any of the private initiatives that you disparage. I, and many of the children, of that generation did fine without them.

    Education should be for the students not a playground for educational reformers. Public Education should be taken back from the "merry band of billionaires". I was not in Education; now at 83 I am at a local Community College as a volunteer. I do see the challenges of a bad education. The problems won't be solved with programs that these "do-gooders" have imposed on the nation. Before they to race to the top, students should be given the tools to move on in measured steps with "… a deep and rich curriculum for all students regardless of circumstance or background" I consider myself a beneficiary of a deep and rich curriculum of the past.

    cindraleehenryover 1 year ago

    "...given the tools to move on in measured steps..." what a profoundly insightful declaration. You have summed it up perfectly. Whatever tools the individual needs to move forward one step at a time toward their individual best...that is key.

    Join the discussion

  • cindraleehenry commented on a link

    An Open Letter to President Obama from Bill Ayers via magazine.good.is

    105

    cindraleehenryover 1 year ago

    Thank you, Bill Ayers, for putting into clear, logical, and compelling words what many of us have been feeling. Thank you.

    We have created a monster. Magnet schools. Charter schools. Private schools. Parochial and faith-based schools. Where have our neighborhood public schools gone, what has happened to them? The public school system was once something we could be proud of, a cornerstone of democracy that leveled the playing field and provided opportunity for the enrichment and education of all children. Now, we act like our public schools are only for children who are not fortunate enough to attend school elsewhere.

    Here in Southern California families that aspire to the American Dream, who care about providing a good foundation for their children, do everything in their power to work hard enough to send their children to "good" schools rather than public schools, often driving vast distances to take and retrieve their children from schools nowhere near their neighborhood.

    What a change since I grew up in the 50's and 60's where everyone went to public school and we felt sad for the kids in private or parochial schools because they missed out on so much. And what a huge difference there is now in what schools provide for our children. Long gone are the enrichment programs that my generation enjoyed. Band, orchestra, choir, drama, art, sports, and all the clubs. Now, if a child wants to participate in these things the parents must be able to afford to pay for it, whether it's buying sports equipment, art equipment, musical instruments. And that's assuming there is even an instructor available to run the program...often there isn't.

    Of course, we have various funded programs (quite separate from the school curriculum) available for disadvantaged children. There are some wonderful programs...but of course they are dependent on the continuation of the funding sources. If the funding source goes away, so does the program.

    But enough of my ranting. William Ayers has said it more effectively. Please pass this plea along...perhaps it will make a difference.

    Join the discussion

  • cindraleehenry thinks this is good

    An Open Letter to President Obama from Bill Ayers via magazine.good.is

    105

  • cindraleehenry is now following…