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Jessica Doong

writer, educator, and daydream believer.

I am good at imagining possibilities, learning from my experiences, and discovering beauty along the way.

Location
Globe, Arizona
Website
jdoong.wordpress.com/

Activity

  • Jessica Doong thinks this is good

    Exploratory Learning: A Toolkit to Turn Elementary School Kids Into 'Neighborhood Detectives' via magazine.good.is

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  • Jessica Doong commented on a link

    Don't be afraid to kill good ideas. via hollywoodreporter.com

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    Jessica Doongabout 1 year ago

    How do you edit a post on here? Did not mean to post that thumbnail pic, ha!

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  • Jessica Doong shared a link

    Don't be afraid to kill good ideas. via hollywoodreporter.com

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  • Jessica Doong replied to a comment by Berl Kaufman

    Stop Exploring 'Innovative Education Models', We Need Action Now via magazine.good.is

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    Berl Kaufmanabout 1 year ago

    Thanks for interjecting Jessica.
    I understand your perspective: it derives from experiments based on a very firmly established status quo - the current framework for education in this country. We desperately need to recast that framework, which is fundamentally flawed. We need to question all our cherished premises about education as a "system" or as "model" (as you put it). We need to view education from a perspective that actually works, that would and could foster the ideas espoused by CHILD.

    Those principles cannot possibly arise in a top down approach. Top down approaches create standards, testing, etc. They result in a lowest common denominator education, which is what we have now, and it's getting worse. The grassroots efforts as promulgated on this site and various links I've seen are still trying to function with the conventional framework, which is deeply flawed. Public schools, by definition, cannot function in a grassroots change mode. It's impossible. We need to completely abandon the role of government in educating our kids.

    In spite of Chris' strong feelings to the contrary, the only framework that really works is one that views the children and their parents as customers. Sorry Chris. Point of fact is that every human interaction is a microcosm of a market place. A small market. That includes public schools, private schools, even gulags.The question becomes the degree to which the participants are truly free to engage in the commerce. The gulag is 0% free. The private school, probably 90%. The typical public school is closer to the gulag: standards, systems, control. Very little progress and innovation is possible within that framework. The framework that works in one in which the needs of the subjects are being satisfied. That is best serviced by the freest market possible, where there are no tariffs, no restraint on trade, no restraint on ideas, on methods, etc.

    The for-profit education perspective you've encountered still involves a huge amount of government involvement. Whenever you have govt involvement, you have that top-down framework. It is inescapable. Education should not be funded by taxpayers, by communities using coercion.

    Imagine for a moment there were no government schools in a given town. What would happen? What would take their place spontaneously? I have some ideas, but it's an interesting gedanken experiment to imagine what would happen.

    Jessica Doongabout 1 year ago

    I see what you are saying and definitely agree that top-down control is a huge problem in education and many other systems which are often tied to the government.

    I guess theories and language notwithstanding, we can all agree that there are aspects of education that we are displeased with. I've recently been challenged in my own life to invest less of my energies in being right and more of them in engaging in something I believe to be true.

    I don't think there is just a single solution to the problems in education. As a natural idealist who prides herself on being creative and having great ideas, it's been humbling to realize that no matter how great I think my ideas are, they are just ideas until I do something with them. I've been challenged to be willing to try things out, admit when one of my great ideas just doesn't work for the kids I'm working with, and mostly to put aside my own ego and fears to engage with kids where they are at. I think that every person who cares can bring his/her unique experiences and ideas to the table and press forward into something new.

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  • Jessica Doong replied to a comment by Chris Thinnes

    Stop Exploring 'Innovative Education Models', We Need Action Now via magazine.good.is

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    Chris Thinnesabout 1 year ago

    Thanks Jessica for sharing your thoughts! Whether from 'inside' or 'outside' the system, and with some combination of the 'fear' and 'fun' to which you refer, I'm sure you'll continue to lend an important voice to discussion and action.

    Jessica Doongabout 1 year ago

    Thanks, Chris! I think one of the other challenges I am facing is learning to be flexible so I can adapt to what the kids I'm working with really need, rather than just trying to make what I think is a good idea work. I guess it's one of those things you can only learn as you are trying things out!

    It's funny how being outside of the structured environment I am used to is both what I asked for and the source of my fears. It's like now I have no one to answer to, but I also have no one to take responsibility for my decisions except myself. What do you do when you can do anything is my question of the hour. Guess I'll find out!

    I think it's definitely forcing me to be more creative, to think more independently, and ultimately to get in touch with more of who I am and how I am meant to uniquely connect with and care for kids.

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  • Jessica Doong replied to a comment by Berl Kaufman

    Stop Exploring 'Innovative Education Models', We Need Action Now via magazine.good.is

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    Berl Kaufmanabout 1 year ago

    Would you kindly explain to me your apparent revulsion for individuals or companies making a profit on education? I have heard this from a number of people, but I just don't get it.

    Jessica Doongabout 1 year ago

    Berl, if I could interject here...As someone who has worked in for-profit education I could speak to my own experience, for what it's worth. I don't necessarily think that an organization working for profit is inherently evil, nor that every non-profit organization is free from corruption.

    However, I do think that you have to take a look at what drives a company. Its values and priorities become crystal clear when you look at their decisions and decision-making process.

    The unfortunate reality in education (whether expressly for profit or not) is that when the bottom line is money, the students and staff suffer.

    The ironic thing is that I have a feeling that a model of education that prioritizes the people (students and staff) instead of making money or maintaining the system would likely end up being financially sustainable. I have no research to back that up, but that's just a guess based on the premise that people are looking for good ideas and welcome change that would be good for their souls.

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  • Jessica Doong thinks this is good

    Stop Exploring 'Innovative Education Models', We Need Action Now via magazine.good.is

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  • Jessica Doong commented on a link

    Stop Exploring 'Innovative Education Models', We Need Action Now via magazine.good.is

    19

    Jessica Doongabout 1 year ago

    Totally agree. Been thinking less about changing the system and more about changing myself. Or, rather, allowing myself to be changed and be an agent of change. For me, that will likely take place outside the confines of the system.

    I'm not saying systemic change is impossible, but I think the urgency you convey here is apparent to me as well. The change can't wait. (Kids are dying in the current system. Their curiosity and creativity are being trampled into the ground. Kids who do not learn in the traditional way are being told, essentially, that they are failures because they don't fit into the box the system has deemed to be good.) And, from my experience, you have to take a good look at what is driving the system. And if you find, as I did, that those values and priorities are different from your own, then don't expect change to ever happen. You may just find your own creativity, passion, etc. trampled into the ground.

    So many great ideas are out there, but I guess the scary (and fun) part is trying some of those theories out. I applaud all the educators out there that are practicing a student-centered approach to learning. I think that any step is a step in the right direction if we are putting the interests of kids at heart. If we are listening to them and helping them to find and celebrate their unique voices. If we are looking at them as whole beings rather than numbers or merely minds. And if we are engaging them in a way that also brings life to our own souls! :)

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  • Jessica Doong thinks this is good

    The City That Never Was: How LA Almost Became New York via architizer.com

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  • Jessica Doong thinks this is good

    Why We've Turned our Apartment Into a Part-time Restaurant via magazine.good.is

  • Jessica Doong thinks this is good

    What would major cities look like without light pollution? via smithsonianmag.com

  • Jessica Doong wants to do this

    Fall in love with a stranger's story: read a story and share your story with The Strangers Project

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