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Hassan Walker

Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, And therefore is win

I am good at giving a damn.

Location
Augusta, Georgia

Activity

  • Hassan Walker commented on a link

    'Django Unchained': Quentin Tarantino's Misappropriation of the N-Word via magazine.good.is

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    Hassan Walkerover 1 year ago

    Had this been any other director, I wouldn't have had a problem, most likely. But this came from a man who said ROOTS wasn't ACCURATE.
    ROOTS. ALEX HALEY'S ROOTS. That is the equivalent of saying real life items are photoshopped.
    His view of Black America is so warped, its unfathomable to him that we don't carry around guns and demean each other.

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  • Hassan Walker replied to a comment by Ayarri Conway

    'Django Unchained': Quentin Tarantino's Misappropriation of the N-Word via magazine.good.is

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    Ayarri Conwayover 1 year ago

    With all due respect, nigga shut up.

    Honestly, this is ridiculous; We have taken a word the was used to subjigate and humiliate us, and turned it into a term of affection among ourselves.

    It is a fact of life that language constantly evolves. The word "nigga" is just one word that has evolved.

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  • Hassan Walker replied to a comment by Charlie Bronson

    'Django Unchained': Quentin Tarantino's Misappropriation of the N-Word via magazine.good.is

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    Charlie Bronsonover 1 year ago

    You are absolutely right.

    QT has been clear about his fondness of other cultures and most of his films include homages to different cultures styles of film making. Most of the negative reactions to his use of the N-word have come from people who have disliked QT ever since Jackie Brown. Spike Lee has taken offense to that film and created a wake of accused bigotry. There is a big difference between "Nigger" and "Nigga" and if you dont think so then you must not live somewhere the term gets used in both ways, often.

    He may not be a genius film maker, he does steal a lot of bits from other films but they are usually not made in the US and people have not seen them or are ignorant to his many homages.

    Do people really think Jamie Foxx and Sam Jackson would be a slave movie playing slaves if they didnt agree with its constant use of N-word and depictions of slavery?
    Granted Jackson will take any role that pays, but Foxx is a good actor with a good reputation.

    Also just to note, Racism is about the power associated with keeping people divided by color. You dont see many slave movies where the main protagonist is a slave who is a badass. Being "African American" I am proud to see a hero role so different and interesting to represent our culture in a time when this could barely be possible QT made it happen.

    Hassan Walkerover 1 year ago

    I love the context of the story. But the gratuitous and useless repetition of the n-word is what ruins it. It carries no weight, in a time where it would have been its most demeaning. It leads me to believe QT has a skewed view of Black people, like we've always said nigga, since the beginning of time.

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  • Hassan Walker replied to a comment by US2

    'Django Unchained': Quentin Tarantino's Misappropriation of the N-Word via magazine.good.is

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    US2over 1 year ago

    There is no difference between the word nigger and nigga. It's just a continuation of the madness by people with an AfroSaxon mentality. Try calling a Latino a spic or spica, or a Jew a kike or kika, or an Itatian a wop or wopa, and see how far that gets ya.

    This is why people of African descent have so little respect for each other, and why others continue to disrepect us. It's like putting honey on manure (changing nigger to nigga), it still smells and I'm sure would taste the same. Isn't it insane that out of all of the words in the english language, many people of African descent still choose to describe themselves and others by this word?

    Racism is the belief that one socalled race is superior to another so called race, and then acting on it. Too many people of African descent have an inferiority complex. They believe that others are superior to them. An example is anyone who accepts a racist rhodes scholarship, and a community that says nothing.

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  • Hassan Walker replied to a comment by Fu_Basho

    'Django Unchained': Quentin Tarantino's Misappropriation of the N-Word via magazine.good.is

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    Fu_Bashoover 1 year ago

    I'm not really debating over respect here. But in response to that statement, people should respect people, period, despite nuances. Racism (and furthermore, bigottry) itself is an assumption that due to differences in people and their ways of being, which essentially have nothing to do with anything but how they interact with each other and the world.

    As you mentioned, drugs were put into our communities, apparently (theorists say), by the Reagan administration. If we're going to act as if this is totally true (it totally might be, but I have no actual idea, just the idea of what kind of crap people involved in our government have gotten into in the past and present)--I think it would surely be as you said, about respecting ourselves. That is, saying no to selling crack-cocaine to our kin and neighbors.

    But this brings me to a point I was trying to make, and mostly to the writer of this article:

    The big bad “diablos blanco” didn't somehow trick those actors (who are comedians) to do what they did—play the roles they did. This is something they commonly did, before Quentin wrote this film (which I have not seen yet). This isn't a case of a White Man exploiting some naïve black actors into “humiliating” their people. As I said, this wasn't stuff they had to summon, it was in their toolboxes, and the truth is, people (our people) are pretty often like that.

    The dialogue in this article, to me, felt more like attacks on Quentin, and how he was basically a film nerd who fetishized “black culture” than a dissection of the usage of the “N-word” by black folk. That really rubbed me wrong, to be frank.

    If we were to dissect the usage of the word “nigga” (versus “nigger”--the slur) that'd be a whole different story. We'd start at “nigger”--an already missappropriated and modified word—and end up at the culturally appropriated version “nigga”--which, by the way is not “racist”, man.

    You can look up the definition yourself. I mentioned a bit of it before in the first part of this post. Now if you want to say “reverse racism”, thats one thing. It's also grasping for straws. As far as the term “blacksploitation” as a genre... there are a bunch of ironically and nonsensically named sub-genres of film. Mumblecore, Spaghetti-Western, Sushi-Western... that last two... look them up. Actually Quentin did a great distopian Sushi-Western.

    Thinking about this, I remember he makes a cameo in that film where he admits to being an “Otaku”--which is actually a term for a fan of Japanese media and culture (most notably anime, games, and comics)...seems to me, he is a lover of cultures not his own. And he tries to depict them in his movies.
    I really don't see a problem with this.

    Hassan Walkerover 1 year ago

    I see what you're saying, but let me ask you something: What makes you think that the word nigga isn't just an aside way to put each other down. When I think of slaves calling each other nigga, this would be because that is all they know. I don't care what it's denotative meaning is, nigga is a racially charged word. Calling us each other this is basically hands-free racism; why should they say it, if we'll do it for them?

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  • Hassan Walker replied to a comment by Charlie Bronson

    'Django Unchained': Quentin Tarantino's Misappropriation of the N-Word via magazine.good.is

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    Charlie Bronsonover 1 year ago

    So by your logic; a black person saying Nigga to another black person is racist?

    Don't you think Samuel L Jackson and Jamie Foxx read this script for the movie they were in about slaves? I'm sure they were very sensitive to the whole idea, especially when QT is behind the camera.

    First off, the term Nigger comes from the word Negro which is Spanish for the color black. Portuguese slave traders were selling "Negros" and the Americans buying they mispronounced it often calling them "Niggers" so the term itself was just supposed to mean "Black"! Go figure.

    Now them being racist would mean that one group would be superior to another due to the difference in their race or the other would be less desirable. I don't see how the term "Nigga" could be used from one black person to another and be racist.

    You have a misunderstanding of the term Racism.

    Hassan Walkerover 1 year ago

    The point you just made is telling me that you want to be identified by a racist term. I mean, the road to Hell is paved with good intentions. In Asian culture, a swastika is a symbol of good luck, but Hitler twisted it to one of hatred and bigotry. So would you wear a shirt with one on it as well. Don't let your mind be clouded, brother. The second you accept second-best, they've won.

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  • Hassan Walker replied to a comment by Hassan Walker

    'Django Unchained': Quentin Tarantino's Misappropriation of the N-Word via magazine.good.is

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    Hassan Walkerover 1 year ago

    I understand where you are coming from, and I have many friends and family members who feel the same. The point I am making, is that how can we expect anyone to respect us if we won't respect ourselves? Its called blackspoitation for a reason. They are doing what they do best, exploitation. Even if it is not intentional, it is still racist. Comedy is comedy, but hatred and bigotry are completely different. And it is true we are selling drugs and killing each other, but which race pushed us into this predicament? Reagan released drugs into our community, and he certainly was not of African descent.

    Hassan Walkerover 1 year ago

    And the word nigger or nigga is always racist, no matter who is saying it.

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  • Hassan Walker replied to a comment by Fu_Basho

    'Django Unchained': Quentin Tarantino's Misappropriation of the N-Word via magazine.good.is

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    Fu_Bashoover 1 year ago

    sorry for the late reply, discuss has been acting lame.

    I think the word can be pretty vile. I think the word is running it's course, and we can let it. Lots of groups of people have taken pejorative labels and used them. I can mention a bunch of cultures and subcultures where this has happened. One that comes to mind first that isn't as offensive as many “adopted” labels is “Punk”... Most people don't even know where that actually came from. There are tons of -words- like these. We forget this: they're words, and words have meanings (sometimes just a squint of intention shifts it). If I was a bigot, I'd call someone who was gay that particular “f-word”. I wouldn't though. Then again, I have known people from the LGBT community who use it facetiously.

    Obviously it's meant to be jocular. We're not calling each other the Negro that a racist or slave trafficker, owner, or overseer would call us.

    As far as what you said regarding the Asian cliche`s...ironically I was talking about that with a friend. Stereotypes are called so for a reason. Sometimes we use them, and we harness them in fiction, referring to them as “tropes”--but they are what they are:

    A representation of something that occurs frequently. Comedy does this A LOT. QT is a comedic writer, at heart. He's a joker. And his irreverence and ability to make crazy stuff the basis of jokes (or just sheer irreverence, period), is part of his skill set. And fortunately he writes movies, instead of doing stand up (lol).

    If I createda character from Asia who was a martial artist or assassin (who rode a “rice burner”), or a member of the Yakuza or Triad (which are way used tropes in Asian cinema and fiction) unless I did it in an insulting and mocking manner, what would be the real issue? If I'm presenting something for you to see, that you can see just by looking out into the world, I don't see many people getting up in arms. Then again, if I had them running around constantly bowing and mixing up their L's and R's in pronunciation of english—gratuitously, then that might be a problem.

    Problem with this, is that, well...(and this comes from someone who grew up in urban settings around the United States) black folk do be sayin' “Nigga”, a bit. It seriously is basically, to us, like saying “dude”, or “bro”, or “fool”--actually, based on etymological roots, alone, “fool” is, at default an offensive word, period, isn't it?

    Seems like I'm splittting hairs, here. I sort of am. To explain: I am not as much attached to the word, more than I am, the part it has in the culture. Growing up, I always knew there was an intrinsic difference between “that's my nigga” and “that's a nigger”. Maybe it's perspective.

    I do understand how it can make certain people feel uncomfortable, especially if you never had a bunch of people throwing it around you a lot, growing up, and definitely if you may have some issues of guilt (if you were a person of non-colour) and just shock when you hear it.

    As far as the solidarity between us “brothers and sisters”-- I'd say, it'd be more important we stop robbing each other, and selling our people crack and smack, and hating on the ambitious (and even smallest) among us, than to quibble over a word that was “misappropriated” for racist use from the start. Meaning: it wasn't an offensive word to start with.

    Hassan Walkerover 1 year ago

    I understand where you are coming from, and I have many friends and family members who feel the same. The point I am making, is that how can we expect anyone to respect us if we won't respect ourselves? Its called blackspoitation for a reason. They are doing what they do best, exploitation. Even if it is not intentional, it is still racist. Comedy is comedy, but hatred and bigotry are completely different. And it is true we are selling drugs and killing each other, but which race pushed us into this predicament? Reagan released drugs into our community, and he certainly was not of African descent.

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  • Hassan Walker replied to a comment by Fu_Basho

    'Django Unchained': Quentin Tarantino's Misappropriation of the N-Word via magazine.good.is

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    Fu_Bashoover 1 year ago

    I think you're perhaps mis-appropiating the use of the term "black culture". Use of the "n-word" (which has two variants, and is, in fact, basically two different words due to not just contextual meaning but pronunciation) is common in Urban culture. Heck, I've even heard *to my face* white people use it, during my life--then again, context, context, context.

    It didn't offend me like someone yelling "nigger!" out at me, because "nigga" is basically "dude". Or "Bitch", or "Bitchez". C'mon.

    Yes, QT is pretty crude, irreverant--that's his schtick. And his love for "black culture" is akin to my love of Japanese stuff (and culture) because, the Japanese are just awesome(!). Maybe you just shouldn't watch his films, period.

    And yes, before you wonder, I am, indeed, a person of "African Descent"

    Hassan Walkerover 1 year ago

    The word, in any context is very vile. Using the prospect of a slave narrative in order to have permission to use the word 'nigga' or 'nigger' is wrong. We aren't learning anything from it. The really sad part is that if you are going to display a culture, don't exploit it. What if all Asian films had Asian guys with small penises, waving around katanas, and calling each other'Chink' or 'Jap'? I like Japanese culture as well, but my Black brothers always come first in my book.

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