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Ari Krepostman

If you're reading this, you don't need to be reading this.

I am good at giving a damn.

Location
Los Angeles, California

Activity

  • Ari Krepostman replied to a comment by Deborah Menkart

    Online Anywhere You Go: A Backup Generator for the Internet via magazine.good.is

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    Deborah Menkart11 months ago

    I generally enjoy receiving The Daily Good, but today I was dismayed to read “If the Technology Works in Africa, It Will Work Anywhere.” It implies that Africa is so un-developed and backward that it is a miracle if anything sophisticated works. It reflects and perpetuates the negative and erroneous stereotypes of Africa that have been intentionally promoted for centuries to justify enslavement, genocide, colonization, and now globalization. The myths are perpetuated in schools today and the mainstream media. Children do not learn about the scholarship and science that originated in Africa, they do not learn about the geographic diversity, the fact that is not a country, the cities, the abundance of food, the literature, the Nobel Prize winners, the scientists, the teachers…. Instead they just learn about wild animals, starvation, "savages," and get the impression that Africa is a country. Here is an article about how these myths are introduced to young children and the damage they cause: http://www.tolerance.org/magazine/number-34-fall-2008/feature/i-didnt-know-there-were-cities-africa The article provides useful insights for schools and the media when writing about African countries.

    Ari Krepostman8 months ago

    Aside from that, its just a friggin' satellite-connected modem packaged with a battery... Where is the "Good" in that?? Its a product like any other.

    Heck, if this is "Good"-worthy, I think "Good" should just start promoting the latest massage chair from Brookstone.

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  • Ari Krepostman commented on a link

    Online Anywhere You Go: A Backup Generator for the Internet via magazine.good.is

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    Ari Krepostman8 months ago

    This is anything but good. This is just another modem. Nothing special. What, it connects to a satellite? Wow. Just feeds the constant data stream and energy addiction. It will sell like hotcakes, but is this really worthy of "Good"? I think not.

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  • Ari Krepostman commented on a link

    How a Co-Working Space Can Transform Downtown Los Angeles via magazine.good.is

    Ari Krepostman8 months ago

    First of all, LA is CHOCK FULL of co-working spaces. Sooooo how in the world is this relevant to "Good"? This is a business like any other that is trying to fulfill a need that small businesses (aka freelancers) might find useful or even necessary.

    With this update, its so nice to see that Good is interested in doing more than promoting *actual* positive change for the world, its also interested in Press Releases for a regular old carbon-emitting business (what, you didn't know that even your iPhone uses more electricity per year that you refrigerator?)

    How refreshing.

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  • Ari Krepostman replied to a comment by munmay

    An Employee Fired for Tip-Shaming Raises the Question About Tipping and Food Trucks via magazine.good.is

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    munmay9 months ago

    I've been in the US only since 09. The tipping culture continues to confuse me. You open a restaurant business, hoping for customers to come in and eat your food. Operating a restaurant come with a set of expenses, much like any other businesses. You decided to run it, you should then think about how to bare your own expenses, including your waiters and waitresses. Why should I need to pay for my food (helping your business) and pay for taxes and then help your business again by supporting your workers, you are the employer, you support your own employees. Much like how a creative agency, for example, takes care of their own expenses and employees. They don't expect clients to pay more for my pencils and computer, when all these have been taken in consideration when they set their service price. Employees in a creative agency work like crazy, no sleep, early mornings, they do great work, well some of them do. But nobody is taking care of them? Oh yes! their employers do. I would tip the security guard who warns me of danger in the middle of the night, but it's not in your culture, I would tip the firefighter for saving people in a burning building, but it's not in your culture either. I would also tip a speaker in a conference because he opened my eyes, but it's too weird to do in your culture. These public shamings are getting out of hand. Someone did not tip, not the person's fault, he gave you business, in fact, you should thank him. He could have went to another truck or restaurant or beauty salon but he chose to come to your establishment. You put out signs of your menu, took the effort to work in a food truck when you could be doing anything else that, invested in bettering your truck's appearance, invested in a bunch of appliances, truck, utensils, etc, hoping someone would give you a return on your investment. So he did. But, you chose to shame him because you're not happy enough--he didn't leave you with something that's completely voluntary to hand out. Time to shame someone else. But I'm not a fan of the blamming game.

    Ari Krepostman9 months ago

    Dear foreigner, Just because you are confused doesn't mean it doesn't make sense. We tip for good service. Its a gesture to say I acknowledge you are providing me a service and you do your work in a manner that makes me feel good.

    When in Rome, do as the Romans do -- or face their disapproving scowls or worse.

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  • Ari Krepostman commented on a link

    An Employee Fired for Tip-Shaming Raises the Question About Tipping and Food Trucks via magazine.good.is

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    Ari Krepostman9 months ago

    Whether or not food truck workers "deserve" tips is not really at issue. What is at issue is Brendan O'Connor and his immenseand ridiculou sense of entitlement. This guy sounds like a first class brat. First, he spouts off his mouth AT A CUSTOMER over Twitter. Then, he goes on to blame his employer for cracking down on what he thinks of as advocating for himself. He was not "advocating" for himself at all. He was making a fool of himself by blaming the (almost) victim of his own tirade (his employer could easily have lost Glass, Lewis, & co as a client had the twitter remark gone unreported. The proper way to deal with this sitch would have been for O'Connor to inform his employer of the tip oversight on the part of the customer. It would be up the the employer to discuss the issue witht he client, give the employee a little "make up tip", or perhaps, do nothing at all. As an employer, if I'd found out my employee had done something similar to O'Connor, I too would have fired him on the spot.

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