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Zoë Prillinger

Design Principal, Ogrydziak Prillinger Architects

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  • Zoë Prillinger replied to a comment by EricWeinstein

    Designing Streets for People, Not Just Cars via magazine.good.is

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    EricWeinstein7 months ago

    Any sort of bulb out is deadly for cyclists. The road narrows suddenly and you're forced into the car traffic lane! Not a good thing! All these protrusions a designed to reduce the time of peds in an intersection,but they take too much of the decision - making time away from the traffic. Safety islands seem to work a bit better. How about you try again with a center street island?

    Zoë Prillinger7 months ago

    Please see my response to a similar comment below:

    (Good question (there are several comments regarding how curb extensions affect bike lanes). It would be irrational to create bike lanes only to abruptly truncate them at intersections, forcing bikers into car traffic.

    By design, bulb-outs don't encroach on the bike lane at all (and thus, don't 'narrow' the portion of road used for movement), but instead only occupy the width of the parking lane at the corner. Because parked cars don't typically wrap around the corner, cyclists naturally 'cut' these corners diagonally--but then they're still forced to merge adjacent to fast-moving cars that haven't confronted any slowing measures across the intersection.

    With this in mind, we designed our bulb outs to accomplish what a curb-height, rounded bulb-out might not--slowing traffic not just on the turn, but across the entire intersection zone. Their bulk and height, in addition to ample surface hatching, reduce vehicular speed from all street directions, and the chamfered geometry still allows cyclists to 'cut corners' without being forced into traffic in the intersection.

    In locations where bike lanes have been created by eliminating parking lanes, I agree that curb extensions are problematic. Our in-depth proposal (not fully described in this article) allows for site-specific variations, which in a case like this might have curb extensions only on one side of the street (eg. the new bike lanes on Oak and Fell Streets).)

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  • Zoë Prillinger replied to a comment by william.furr

    Designing Streets for People, Not Just Cars via magazine.good.is

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    william.furr7 months ago

    Where does the bike lane go? I love curb extensions when I'm walking, but I hate them when I'm cycling – they force me into the traffic lane with cars. What about routing a bike lane behind the curb extension so that there's a small island between the bike lane and the traffic lane?

    The example intersections you chose here all have street parking on both sides of all streets. That's a ton of asphalt given over to private vehicle storage, and a configuration that's hopefully becoming less common as road space is re-apportioned fairly to other uses, such as bike lanes.

    Zoë Prillinger7 months ago

    Good question (there are several comments regarding how curb extensions affect bike lanes). It would be irrational to create bike lanes only to abruptly truncate them at intersections, forcing bikers into car traffic.

    By design, bulb-outs don't encroach on the bike lane at all (and thus, don't 'narrow' the portion of road used for movement), but instead only occupy the width of the parking lane at the corner. Because parked cars don't typically wrap around the corner, cyclists naturally 'cut' these corners diagonally--but then they're still forced to merge adjacent to fast-moving cars that haven't confronted any slowing measures across the intersection.

    With this in mind, we designed our bulb outs to accomplish what a curb-height, rounded bulb-out might not--slowing traffic not just on the turn, but across the entire intersection zone. Their bulk and height, in addition to ample surface hatching, reduce vehicular speed from all street directions, and the chamfered geometry still allows cyclists to 'cut corners' without being forced into traffic in the intersection.

    In locations where bike lanes have been created by eliminating parking lanes, I agree that curb extensions are problematic. Our in-depth proposal (not fully described in this article) allows for site-specific variations, which in a case like this might have curb extensions only on one side of the street (eg. the new bike lanes on Oak and Fell Streets).

    Join the discussion

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    Designing Streets for People, Not Just Cars via magazine.good.is

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    Beautiful Photographs of Infrastructure: The Underpinnings That Make Civilization Civilized via magazine.good.is

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    Social Designers: Why Our Own Neighborhoods Need Us as Much as Sub-Saharan Africa via magazine.good.is

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