Communities

He photographed Nazi atrocities and buried the negatives. The unearthed images are unforgettable.

He risked his life to leave a "historical record of our martyrdom."

via Yad Vashem and Archive of Modern Conflict, 2007

In September 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland. By April 1940, the gates closed on the Lodz Ghetto, the second largest in the country after Warsaw.

Throughout the war, over 210,000 people would be imprisoned in Lodz.

Among those held captive was Henryk Ross. He was a Jewish sports photographer before the Nazi invasion and worked for the the ghetto's Department of Statistics during the war. As part of his official job, he took identification photos of the prisoners and propaganda shots of Lodz' textile and leather factories.

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Neo-Nazi Andrew Anglin, founder and editor of The Daily Stormer, must pay $14 million to Tanya Gersh, a Jewish woman he organized a troll army against.

The Daily Stormer is an American neo-Nazi, white supremacist, and Holocaust denial commentary website and message board that advocates for the genocide of Jewish people.

Five years ago, Anglin encouraged his readers to harass Gersh after he accused her of attempting to extort the mother of white nationalist Richard Spencer. Gersh has denied the allegations.

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Communities

Intoxicated man who his car behind leaves honest plea for the police

Most of us have been in this exact situation.

As we know, the police and parking enforcement officials aren't always the most accommodating when it comes to taking circumstances into account before writing a ticket. In fact, they're generally the absolute worst.

But that didn't dissuade one Wisconsin man from requesting leniency from the powers that be, when he left his car at a meter overnight after drinking too much.

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Can a giant mirrored sculpture draw attention to one of the most important, and under-recognized, documents ever written? A pop-up art installation created by GOOD and Human Rights Watch is seeking to do just that.

The creation, titled #HumanFamily, celebrates the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), a landmark document declaring fundamental rights for all of humanity.

The installation is inspired by the opening words of the 1948 document which reads, "Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world..."

The art, which is designed to inspire curiosity and engagement with the UDHR, includes an eight-foot-tall mirrored lenticular that reads, "MEMBER OF THE HUMAN FAMILY." Other messages become visible when the object is viewed from different perspectives. On the back is a mirror highlighting the 30 individual articles of the UDHR.

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Communities

Carrollton, Texas is a relatively small city with a population of just over 100,000 people. It's the perfect testing ground for how powerful, and positive, real community policing can be. And in this case, local law enforcement absolutely nailed it.

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Mother of three Meg Nagle ignited an internet firestorm of controversy after recently posting a photo of herself breastfeeding her sister’s baby to her Facebook page. Nagle, who was watching her nephew while the baby’s mom was at work, decided to nurse the infant herself after the four-month-old refused to drink his mother’s milk from a bottle. Nagle, who’s an international board certified lactation consultant (IBCLC), told LittleThings that her sister had given her permission and that the child fell asleep immediately.

Still, many people thought her actions were disgusting and wrong and didn’t hesitate to publicly express their disapproval. Nagle, however, is unfazed. She believes that it’s important to bring awareness to wet nursing, often the only option a mom has to deliver the important nutrients that come from breast milk.

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