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Communities

When homeowner Kazeem Oyeneyin was awakened by his burglar alarm he didn't expect a police officer to show up with his gun drawn, handcuff him in his underwear, and parade him outside in front of his neighbors under the suspicion of trying to burglarize his own home. But, unfortunately, that is exactly what happened.

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Culture
via Google Maps

Anne Lamott once put it perfectly when she wrote, "You can safely assume you've created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do."

When it comes to Christianity, some practitioners believe that the words of Jesus Christ help them to be welcoming of people regardless of their race or sexuality. While others use the Bible to validate their own prejudices.

In fact, one of the reasons slavery was able to thrive in the South is that it aligned with teachings found in the Bible.

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Communities
via Yad Vashem and Archive of Modern Conflict, 2007

In September 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland. By April 1940, the gates closed on the Lodz Ghetto, the second largest in the country after Warsaw.

Throughout the war, over 210,000 people would be imprisoned in Lodz.

Among those held captive was Henryk Ross. He was a Jewish sports photographer before the Nazi invasion and worked for the the ghetto's Department of Statistics during the war. As part of his official job, he took identification photos of the prisoners and propaganda shots of Lodz' textile and leather factories.

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Communities
Photo by XVla / Flickr

An ambitious scientific study conducted in Germany shows how discrimination can work on a spectrum. It also shows how anti-Muslim bigotry is affected by how much the target appears to have assimilated into mainstream society.

"It's a common argument, mainly by parties on the right, that immigrants are resistant to integrating," Nicholas Sambanis, a political scientist at the University of Pennsylvania, told the Los Angeles Times.

"They justify conflict and negative attitudes toward immigration and arguments to reduce immigration by referencing these fears that immigrants don't want to integrate," he continued.

To see whether an immigrants perceived adaptation of cultural norms affects the level of discrimination they face, Sambanis and two of his partners conducted a social experiment in 29 train stations that involved over 7,000 bystanders who unwillingly became test subjects.
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Communities
HALO Trust

Each and every day, 23 people are killed by landmines all over the world. That's almost one per hour — and half of those are children, according to The Guardian.

During times of war, landmines are deadly killers. After the war is over, landmines are left behind to kill people even when there's no more enemy. But thanks to the efforts of a brave group of women in Angola, landmines are less of a threat and the community is a safer place.

Between 1975 and 2002, Angola was engaged in a civil war following their independence from Portugal. During the war, many men in the region were killed, and now this group of women are the ones dealing with the aftermath. "People might say it is not work for women, but we can do what men can do, we just need to believe and be strong — this is what I am doing," Olimpia Nduva Chicoma Dala told Global Citizen.

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Communities

It seems like once or twice a year Tomi Lahren will say something so outrageous that the general public can't help but be outraged. Honestly, it's clearly her strategic bread and butter. Offend the snowflakes, generate attention, cash in on said controversy for fame and fortune from her army of followers on the right. Rinse and repeat.

Except for this time, it backfired entirely.

As Wednesday night's Democratic primary debate was getting underway, Lahren took to Twitter to attack Sen. Kamala Harris.

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Articles