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Fin: The Last Days of Fish

A mile or two off the coast of Cape Cod, just east of Wellfleet, Massachusetts, Ted Ligenza shoves a hand across the ignition switch of the Reina Marie, and his 31-foot boat sputters into silence and drifts to a stop. It is not yet dawn on a cold day in January. A five-foot swell lifts and lowers the..

A mile or two off the coast of Cape Cod, just east of Wellfleet, Massachusetts, Ted Ligenza shoves a hand across the ignition switch of the Reina Marie, and his 31-foot boat sputters into silence and drifts to a stop. It is not yet dawn on a cold day in January. A five-foot swell lifts and lowers the boat in the semi-darkness while Ligenza stands at the wheel staring intently at his sonar. When he spots a flicker of color on the screen, he crams the rest of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich into his mouth and ducks into the hold. The Reina Marie, pilotless, begins to drift westward, pushed by the waves and the wind.

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Bombshell in Baghdad

Lara Logan is breaking stories and barriers in the world of network news. PLUS: An original GOOD Video Presentation.

It's hard to look away when Lara Logan is in front of the camera. And it's not because of her blond mane or eye-catching good looks-in today's tepid TV news world, female correspondents are expected to look like models. It's something else that keeps you transfixed-that unrelenting stare as she delivers exclusives from inside a war zone, the gaze that tells viewers that she's been there and knows what she's talking about. Because she has, and she does.Consider her night-vision dispatch from an Afghani minefield or her on-camera infiltration of a Taliban stronghold, and you begin to understand how Logan landed the job of chief foreign correspondent for CBS almost two years ago, at age 34. Though some detractors publicly questioned her quick rise to the top of one of the Big Three networks, Logan has quite the resume. She has been covering conflict for 17 years now-she began reporting as a teenager in her native South Africa. And in her dispatches from Iraq, where she's been covering the war, it's clear she's earned her stripes.Her career began during the heady final days of apartheid, working for the South African newspapers The Daily News and the Sunday Tribune. "You had this sense all the time," she says, "that just beyond your reach there was the truth. The government protected us from that very, very heavily. … I believed enough that the world should know what was happening [and] that if people knew what was really happening in South Africa, that would have to make it change. And I think, in the end, that is what happened."\n\n\n
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"My single greatest achievement is being able to say screw you to all the people who said that a woman like me couldn't make it in this business."
Now, Logan is on a brief trip back to New York from overseas so she can accept an Emmy for "Ramadi: On the Front Line," a heart-racing piece she did for the CBS Evening News that opens with a breathless Logan in full fatigues and helmet, running toward a shaky handheld camera as gunfire thunders all around her. It's like a scene out of Full Metal Jacket, with the addition of the gorgeous and utterly composed Logan."It is so much worse than you can imagine," she says of Iraq, leaning forward. "Do you know what a quadruple amputee looks like? Go to a burn-victim unit, go to any hospital in Baghdad and tell me it's getting better." Her intensity belies the coolheadedness expected of TV reporters. This frankness about the war helps set her apart from some of her colleagues, but it has also gotten her into trouble on more than one occasion.

Logan won an Emmy in September for her story "Ramadi: On The Front Lines" about soldiers in Iraq's Anbar province.

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Hotel Darfur

In [i]Darfur Now[/i], Don Cheadle and activist Adam Sterling show that you can actually do something about Darfur.

In November of 2005, a college kid named Adam Sterling invited actor-turned-activist Don Cheadle to the University of California, Los Angeles to discuss the humanitarian nightmare underway in Sudan's western region of Darfur. In all, eight people showed up. Two years later, thanks in part to their efforts, Darfur has risen to the top of the world's list of concerns, and Cheadle and Sterling are drawing audiences numbering in the thousands. "It's hard to quantify exactly," says Cheadle, "but our grassroots movement has been hard to ignore." And with Darfur Now, a studio-backed, wide-release documentary, they hope they can bring the troubled area to the attention of an even wider audience.It was on a trip to Africa-for the filming of 2004's Hotel Rwanda, which earned the actor a nomination for an Academy Award-that Cheadle, now 42, first heard about the situation in Darfur. The population of Darfur, which is largely ethnically African, has for years been fighting with the mostly Arab Sudanese government over a variety of issues, including human-rights abuses and environmental resources. In 2003, the government helped fund Arab militias, known as janjaweed ("devils on horseback"), to attack villages in Darfur, causing a massive refugee crisis as people fled their homes. The conflict has since claimed 200,000 lives, and displaced more than 2 million people. Cheadle, who flew to the region to view the crisis firsthand, recalls the scene that greeted him: "I was met with the sweetest, most innocent children drawing images of death and guns," he says. "It triggered something in me instantly." Upon his return to the United States, he helped create the nonprofit organization Not On Our Watch to bring the atrocities in Darfur to the public eye.\n\n\n
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I was met with the sweetest, most innocent children drawing these images of death and guns.
Sterling, meanwhile, co-founded the Sudan Divestment Task Force. The organization lobbied for a bill to prohibit California's enormous pension systems from investing in companies that did business with the Sudanese government. The proposed legislation initially fell on deaf ears, but by September of 2006, Sterling-with Cheadle and his fellow celebrity-cum-activist George Clooney-stood alongside Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger as he signed the bill into law. "It's amazing, because at one time I was struggling to get [UCLA's newspaper] The Daily Bruin to cover Darfur," says the 24-year-old Sterling. "All it takes is an effort."It is efforts like Sterling's that are the centerpiece of the director Theodore Braun's new documentary, Darfur Now, which follows several people deeply involved in the conflict as they attempt to find a resolution. In addition to Sterling and Cheadle, the film focuses on Luis Moreno-Ocampo, the soft-spoken chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court who has been building a case of war crimes against Sudanese officials, and Hejewa Adam, a rebel fighter from Darfur, who sings playful songs about killing Sudanese president Omar al-Bashir while walking through the desert with a rifle. For Cheadle, who also serves as the project's producer, the film's focus on Adam shows what is really important. "It's easy for [Sterling and me] to be over here talking about injustices, but [villagers like Hejewa] can definitely pay real consequences for being vocal," he reasons. "If she can be that brave, then it's really very little for me to speak when somebody sticks a camera in my face."

Darfur Now, which documents Cheadle and Sterling's efforts to convince the state of California to divest from companies doing business with the Sudan, was released on November 2, 2007.

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