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Artist Hassan Hajjaj creates portraits to support LA’s Skid Row.

Introducing the Heroes and Sheroes postcard campaign.

Best known for his ability to transform his subjects using custom made garments and his relationship to re-imagining contemporary Moroccan culture, artist Hassan Hajjaj has been dubbed the ‘Andy Warhol of Marrakech.’ And for good reason.

Hajjaj’s colorful, unique portraiture draws attention to everyday heroes.

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Norman Lear’s Daughter Shares How Her Prolific Father Kept Creativity 'All In The Family'

At 95, Lear’s fatherly advice provides wisdom for all of life’s ups and downs.

Legendary television and film producer and activist Norman Lear knows a thing or two about laughter.

He's been helping generations of Americans split sides for decades via his smart, politically minded, and hilarious hit shows, including "All in the Family," "The Jeffersons," "Maude," and “One Day at a Time” — a beloved Cuban-American version of which has just started production on its third season at Netflix.

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Native Superheroes Are The Norm At This All-Indigenous Comics Store

Native Realities produces and distributes graphic novels and comics created for, and by, indigenous peoples around the world.

Photo by Samanta Helou.

Pueblo Jones is out on a mission to track down indigenous artifacts that were stolen through colonization. His adventure-filled quests won’t stop until he has reclaimed the objects and returned them to their rightful owners: the communities where they were taken from.

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This Beirut Hackerspace Brings Tech Startup Spirit To The Middle East

Beirut’s tech boom also has its more grassroots side, driven by one scrappy “hackerspace.”

A build night at Lamba Labs. All photos courtesy of Lamba Labs.

Beirut’s tech scene has surged over the past decade, with the development of a glitzy digital district in the city’s downtown and a burgeoning number of startups and coworking spaces.

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Meet the Young Afghan Women Making Their Voices Heard — By Launching Their Own Media Companies

Through a lifestyle magazine and a women-run television station, these female journalists are changing the media in Afghanistan.

Gellara magazine editor-in-chief Fatana Hassanzada leads a morning editorial meeting in their office in downtown Kabul, Afghanistan. Photo by Color Lense Production, used with permission.

Fatana Hassanzada was only 16 years old when she first appeared as a television news presenter in Afghanistan.

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When #MeToo Comes For Picasso

Is it censorship or cultural sensitivity?

Queen Brunhilde still wears her crown as a horse drags her through the streets by her hair in Italian poet Giovanni Boccaccio’s early 1400s manuscript “Concerning the Fates of Illustrious Men and Women.” She looks young there, though the Frankish queen, who led a kingdom and its military, was 80 when her enemies executed her in 613 A.D. She tells her own story in Boccaccio’s book, sharing the ways that she was wronged. But the narrator — Boccaccio — continually interjects to remind her that her devious femininity and power hunger actually ruined her until, eventually, she’s contrite.

Often, Boccaccio’s manuscripts are commended as some of the earliest deep looks at strong historical women. The women are powerful, but the exhibition “Outcasts,” at The Getty Museum in Los Angeles, points out the prejudices inherent in his approach. The queen “fell victim to the misogyny of later medieval authors who cast her as the archetypal ‘nasty woman,’” reads the exhibition label about Boccaccio’s manuscript, paralleling Brunhilde’s treatment with insults hurled at Hillary Clinton.

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