GOOD
Issue 002

This is Kelly

name    Kelly Reemtsen\rage    39\rlocation    Los Angeles\roccupation    Painter and printmaker\rAnd These Are Her Things\r\r\r1. Ibanez guitar: "I'm learning guitar and learning to read music. I picked something pretty so I would want to play it."\r\r\r\r2. Sharpie collection: "They're like eye candy to me. I..\n

name Kelly Reemtsenage 39location Los Angelesoccupation Painter and printmaker

And These Are Her Things

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A Brief History

From the earliest cave sketch to the latest MoMa escapade.

15,000 B.C.First known form of graffiti: cave paintings in Lascaux, France.1535–1541Michelangelo, while working on the Sistine Chapel, subverts the work by putting patrons' faces on the damned. He also depicts genitals, which are later covered up by Daniele da Volterra, "The Breeches Maker."1773Boston Tea Party. This direct action protest puts "Buy Nothing Day" to shame.1800Francisco de Goya y Lucientes paints "The Family of Charles IV"-controversial because none of the people are made to look attractive. Rather, he paints them as unattractive as they actually appear.1890sWheatpaste is widely used as an adhesive for posters, especially posters of Toulouse-Lautrec paintings. The paintings are so popular and so frequently torn down that they come with instructions on how to remove them without ripping them.1916–1920Peak era of the Dada movement.1938Orson Welles' "War of the Worlds" is broadcast, convincing many listeners that an actual Martian invasion is underway.1949Edward H. Seymour, on the suggestion of his wife, Bonnie, invents the modern aerosol spraypaint can in Chicago, Illinois.1957The Situationist International (rooted in Marxism) forms in the Italian village of Cosio d'Arroscia. Guy Debord is the most prominent French member.1960Jørgen Nash and Asger Jorn form the Situationist Bauhaus.1966–1971The first modern graffiti artists, "Cool Earl" and "Cornbread," begin work in Philadelphia.1968In May, students in Paris occupy the Ecole des Beaux Arts to produce posters that "give concrete support to the great movement of the workers on strike."1969John Lennon and Yoko Ono spend their honeymoon in Amsterdam in bed, performing their "bed-in" in the name of peace.1970Abbie Hoffman writes Steal This Book, a manifesto and instruction manual that advises readers on topics like growing marijauna, living in communes, pirating radio signals, stealing food and credit cards, making pipe bombs, and obtaining a free buffalo from the U.S. Department of the Interior.1977Billboard Liberation Front "improves" its first billboard, Max Factor 26.1981Jean Baudrillard publishes Simulacra and Simulation.1981–1983Parisian Blek le Rat begins a stencil street-art campaign (the stencils being a means of differentiating himself from New York graffiti artists).1982Jay Conrad Livingston writes Guerrilla Marketing.1985Negativland coins the phrase "Culture Jamming" on the collective record JAMCON '84.1989Shepard Fairey begins the OBEY GIANT campaign, what he calls "an experiment in phenomenology," and it proves to be just that: 13 arrests and 17 years later, his is the most recognizablestreet-art campaign in history.Barbie Liberation Organization is formed. Thanks to similarities in the vocal hardware of Teen Talk Barbie and the Talking Duke G.I. Joe, BLO is able to swap the voice boxes of the toys.1989Adbusters launches.1991Negativland releases fake U2 single by sampling parts of U2 songs. U2 sues (and, ironically, later uses many samples on their POP tour).1992Members of Negativland conduct an (ambush) interview with The Edge, who, once they reveal their identities to him, stutters and bumbles his way through the rest of the interview, claiming U2's label (not the band) pursued the lawsuit.1994Justin Hall creates his "Links from the Underground," the internet's first self-published home page, for which the New York Times Magazine later hails him as "the father of personal blogging."1997The Activist Cookbook: Creative Actions for a Fair Economy, by Andrew Boyd, is published.1999The Yes Men create www.gwbush.com in preparation for the 2000 presidential election. Bush, when asked about the defamatory site, says that the site went too far and that "there ought to be limits on freedom."2001January 5 Jonah Peretti orders a pair of custom Nikes with the word "sweatshop" embroidered on them. Nike refuses. The email dialogue circulates around the internet.January 15Wikipedia launches, inspiring debate about authenticity of and authority over information.2003Bar code artist Peter Coffin starts distributing downloadable, printable bar codes that, once adhered to a product and scanned, display a word ("want," "take," "give," "lose") on the register, instead of a price.2004Adbusters sues six major Canadian broadcasters after they refuse to air "subverstisements" for which Adbusters purchased airtime. This same year it launches the Blackspot Sneaker Campaign.2005Bansky places his works in the Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Brooklyn Museum, and The American Museum of Natural History.Google Bombing: Yooter reports that "The Presidency of George W. Bush" is the first link that appears for the search "failure" or "miserable failure."Marissa Mayer from Google responds: "We don't condone the practice of Google Bombing, or any other action that seeks to affect the integrity of our search results, but we're also reluctant to alter our results by hand in order to prevent such items from showing up. Pranks like this may be distracting to some, but they don't affect the overall quality of our search service, whose objectivity, as always, remains the core of our mission."
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Culture Jamming: An Introduction

The Good Guide to Culture Jamming Introduction.

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The Consumer Mutineers

Those who play with or otherwise alter commercial space.

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The Hacktivists

Rebellion can even be found in virtual space, without ever leaving one's bedroom.

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Mirror, Mirror

If you could fix one thing about yourself, would you? And would you stop there? Andrew Postman examines the ethics of a new age of plastic surgery.

A beautiful young woman visited a cosmetic surgeon, wanting him to perform a breast lift and reduction. The procedure she desired was less invasive than the traditional method-the incision encircles the areola rather than running from there down to where breast meets ribcage-but also more complicated, intended for a subset of patients more problematically endowed than she. The surgeon declined her request and advised her not to pursue the surgery. Her breasts were close to perfect. Thirteen other surgeons apparently agreed, also refusing to operate.The 15th surgeon she visited said yes "and ruined her," one of the first 14 surgeons told me. "I still hear about her. She's never recovered. Her life is over."The brilliance of this story-and I'm not at all questioning its veracity; I've heard others like it-is how it carves two birds with one scalpel. From it we learn that (1) there are butcher-surgeons out there and (2) there are unhinged patients, too. While I believe the doctor told me this story out of caveat emptor goodwill, it's actually the second implication that lingers. Because it's just such reports of the Unhinged Subject-the sad, desperate ones; those suffering from body dysmorphic disorder; the Michael Jacksons and Jocelyn Wildensteins (the New York socialite who has allegedly spent millions on countless surgeries, with the result of looking almost feline)-which in part have helped cosmetic surgery's popularity.That's no typo: I mean "helped," not "hurt." As long as supermarket tabloids publish images of the latest iteration of characters like Michael and The Bride of Wildenstein, the rest of us can mollify ourselves. Hey, we're not that pathetic, we'd never pursue that level of transmogrative grotesquery, so what's wrong with the occasional nip or tuck? Each skin peel and cheek implant that Michael gets-pardon; allegedly gets-thrusts him so much further into Freaksville that we're bound to separate the world into Us and Them. And because of the stunning advances the last decade has seen in cosmetic-surgery techniques, instruments, and medicines, Us and Them no longer means Those Who Don't and Those Who Do but rather Those Who Sort of Like Themselves and Those Who Privately Loathe Themselves.With such a broadening pool of patients, though-from 1997 to 2005, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS), cosmetic procedures in this country increased by 444 percent, to 11.5 million-how does the surgeon tell, from just an initial consult, who's an Us and who's a Them? How can he tell which patient will translate into a "Doc, you changed my life!" holiday card, and which a malpractice suit? (Virtually every top surgeon, insists one, has been the subject of at least one suit.) For their part, prospective patients, if diligent, have ample guidance-checking out board certification, membership in reputable national organizations, word of mouth-when trying to distinguish the mostly good surgeons from the bad ("the guy down the street," as several surgeons routinely label the amoral butcher who expresses no qualms about doing anything to anyone). The doctor, though, often relies solely on intuition, from cues picked up in a brief conversation, to determine a patient's psychological soundness. But is that a reliable system? The staggering number of hours top surgeons put into sharpening their technical skills notwithstanding, there's no accurate measure for judging people and their real needs. And while admittedly it's in their interest to steer clear of patients they suspect can't ever be satisfied, there is also the incentive in place to now and then embrace an obsessive, whose patronage may result in a vigorous ongoing business relationship. Cosmetic surgery, more than any medical specialty, brings together doctor and patient speaking different languages. The cosmetic surgeon-"a psychiatrist with a scalpel," as one doctor charitably characterized it-is first and last a technician, trying to determine if the desired procedure can be done, and done well. The patient, meanwhile, wants to know if she or he will look-and hence feel-better. Yes, they're both ostensibly concerned with aesthetics, but in the same way the federal government is ostensibly concerned with a balanced budget."We're not taking care of a functional disorder or removing cancer," says Dr. Cap Lesesne, a top Park Avenue surgeon. "We're operating on perception."At the initial consult, the surgeon often asks some version of, "What don't you like about yourself?"-the recurring salvo asked of potential patients by the plastic surgeons on the popular TV show Nip/Tuck. But even though the question seems nonpartisan, surgeons are still, well, surgeons. ("What's the difference between God and a surgeon?" the wife of one of the Nip/Tuck surgeons quizzed a friend. "God doesn't think he's a surgeon.") So doctors have been known to volunteer an opinion or two-even though it's elective surgery, and even though no one asked. "One surgeon I went to about my naturally hooded eyessaid I needed my upper and lower eyes done, and an upper and lower browlift, too," said Jan (not her name), who writes about beauty for a national women's magazine.
Quote:
Some of us are too narcissistic even to consider cosmetic surgery; some of us are so insecure that if we did pursue it we'd never be happy with the result.
"Then, on his own, he said the bump in my nose was quite bulby. I'd always thought my nose was my best feature. But ever since he-someone who's essentially a sculptor-said that, I've never looked in the mirror and not thought something was wrong with it."

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