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The Planet

At this point most reasonable people agree that climate change is a serious problem. And while a lot of good people are working on solutions, and we're all chipping in by using fewer plastic bags, it's also helpful to understand where the leading causes of the issue stem from. The list of 20 leading emitters of carbon dioxide by The Guardian newspaper does just that.

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The Planet

Unless you've been living under a rock for the past year, you know who Greta Thunberg is. But depending on your chosen media and information outlets, what think you know about her might be totally false.

I've perused comments on articles about Thunberg's climate change activism and have seen the same false statements about her over and over again. Here are some actual cut-and-pasted comments (misspellings included) from just one article in the past week:

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The Planet
via p199 / Wikimedia Commons

The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a terrifying report last year that said the world has 12 years to reduce its carbon output by 45% to avoid a climate catastrophe.

That was last year, so now we have 11 years to get our collective act together.

What will happen if we don't? Inside Climate News says it will result in "dangerous and costly disruptions to global societies and ecosystems, including longer, hotter heat waves and more frequent crop-killing droughts."

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The Planet
Screenshot via Sweden.se/Twitter (left) Wikimedia Commons (right)

Greta Thunberg has been dubbed the "Joan of Arc of climate change" for good reason. The 16-year-old activist embodies the courage and conviction of the unlikely underdog heroine, as well as the seemingly innate ability to lead a movement.

Thunberg has dedicated her young life to waking up the world to the climate crisis we face and cutting the crap that gets in the way of fixing it. Her speeches are a unique blend of calm rationality and no-holds-barred bluntness. She speaks truth to power, dispassionately and unflinchingly, and it is glorious.

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The Planet

Over on the /AskReddit forum, one frustrated citizen got down to brass tacks. In today's world, it's easy to feel hopeless when it comes to the herculean challenges posed by climate change. There's so much to do and it feels like we're constantly barraged with negative warnings that even our most valiant efforts might be in vain.

So, virtually throwing their arms up in air, Reddit user "ExoticFailure" simply begged for an answer: "How do we save this fucking planet?"

In less than five hours, more than 20,000 people liked the question with hundreds more adding in their own comments, questions, and venting their frustrations. But one incredibly thoughtful and detailed response has quickly elevated itself above the chatter. An anonymous user writing under the handle "m4ybe" offered up a detailed, seven-point response that instantly caught fire. While it's unclear if these solutions are backed by science or possible, they sound like a step in the right direction.

Here is their response in its entirety:

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The Planet

More than one-third of the population of the Lakewood-Browns Mill community in Atlanta lives below the poverty line, but now they'll have fresh food literally at their fingertips. What was once a food desert (a low-income area lacking access to fresh foods) is now a food forest (a public space that grows fresh produce). A plot of 7.1 acres of abandoned land has been transformed into a community garden, complete with walking trails. The community is free to pluck food from over 1,000 edible fruit and nut trees, shrubs, and vines.

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