GOOD
Science

The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere hit a record high Monday, a reading from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration that elicited fresh calls from climate activists and scientists for the international community to end planet-heating emissions from fossil fuels and deforestation.

Keep Reading
Science

Even though marathon running is on the decline, half a million people signed up to participate in the 2020 London Marathon. It seems wild that someone would voluntarily sign up to run 26.2 miles, but those half a million people might actually be on to something. A new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that running a marathon can help reverse signs of aging.

Researchers at Barts and University College London looked at 138 first-time marathon runners between the ages of 21 and 69. "We wanted to look at novice athletes. We didn't include people who said they ran for more than two hours a week," Dr. Charlotte Manisty, the study's senior author and cardiologist at University College London, said per CNN.

Keep Reading
Science

According to the Guardian, since the Paris climate agreement was signed in 2016, $700 billion (yes, with a b) in financing had been provided to fossil fuel companies by the world's largest banks. JP Morgan Chase alone provided $75 billion to expand fracking operations and Arctic oil and gas exploration. It's not great, considering the United Nations' Emissions Gap report says we have to cut emissions by 55% by 2030.

Between 2016 and 2018 Goldman Sachs invested $59 billion in fossil fuels, the industry's 12th biggest banker. Now, things are changing, and it's not just the climate. Goldman Sachs recently updated their energy policy for the 21st century, announcing they will no longer provide financing for new Arctic oil drilling or exploration for oil in the Arctic, including the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. They will also stop investing in coal-fired power projects or new thermal coal mines anywhere in the globe. The policy doesn't cover fracking.

Keep Reading
Science
via Apeel

Americans are beginning to wake up to the idea that food waste is a serious problem. According to the USDA, 30 to 40% of the food produced in the U.S. is thrown away.

Food waste is a terrible drain on the average household bank account and is morally questionable at a time when one in eight Americans are food insecure.

Add to that, the environmental impact is staggering. Food waste now accounts for more than one quarter of America's freshwater consumption and approximately 300 million barrels of oil per year.

Keep Reading
Science