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According to the Guardian, since the Paris climate agreement was signed in 2016, $700 billion (yes, with a b) in financing had been provided to fossil fuel companies by the world's largest banks. JP Morgan Chase alone provided $75 billion to expand fracking operations and Arctic oil and gas exploration. It's not great, considering the United Nations' Emissions Gap report says we have to cut emissions by 55% by 2030.

Between 2016 and 2018 Goldman Sachs invested $59 billion in fossil fuels, the industry's 12th biggest banker. Now, things are changing, and it's not just the climate. Goldman Sachs recently updated their energy policy for the 21st century, announcing they will no longer provide financing for new Arctic oil drilling or exploration for oil in the Arctic, including the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. They will also stop investing in coal-fired power projects or new thermal coal mines anywhere in the globe. The policy doesn't cover fracking.

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NASA

Four black women, Engineers Christine Darden and Mary Jackson, mathematician Katherine Johnson, and computer programmer Dorothy Vaughan, worked as "human computers" at NASA during the Space Race, making space travel possible through their complex calculations. Jackson, Johnson, and Vaughn all played a vital role in helping John Glenn become the first American to orbit the Earth.

They worked behind the scenes, but now they're getting the credit they deserve as their accomplishments are brought to the forefront. Their amazing stories were detailed in the book "Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race" by Margot Lee Shetterly, which was later turned into a movie. (Darden was not featured in the movie, but was in the book). Johnson has a building at NASA named after her, and a street in front of NASA's Washington D.C. headquarters was renamed "Hidden Figures Way."

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The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is our piece de resistance of just how disgusting humans have made this planet. The patch sits in a remote part of the Pacific Ocean, somewhere between California and Hawaii. It's home to 1.8 trillion pieces of trash, weighting 88,000 tons. Plastic nets, fishing rope, and plastic bottles have accumulated into a sort of sea landfill. It's one of five ocean gyres (a spot where rotating currents allow marine debris to accumulate), and it's also the world's largest accumulation of plastic waste.

Scientists have known about the five gyres of the world for a while, but haven't studied their impact on marine life. Why would they? The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is an oceanic desert, meaning very few fish and mammals live there. Now, we're getting a better glimpse at how our empty Starbucks cups and plastic bags can mess with marine life. Whales have been spotted interacting with the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

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Screenshot via Sweden.se/Twitter (left) Wikimedia Commons (right)

Greta Thunberg has been dubbed the "Joan of Arc of climate change" for good reason. The 16-year-old activist embodies the courage and conviction of the unlikely underdog heroine, as well as the seemingly innate ability to lead a movement.

Thunberg has dedicated her young life to waking up the world to the climate crisis we face and cutting the crap that gets in the way of fixing it. Her speeches are a unique blend of calm rationality and no-holds-barred bluntness. She speaks truth to power, dispassionately and unflinchingly, and it is glorious.

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