At These Dinners, People Consume Both Refugee Cuisines And Stories

A Syrian chef prepares a meal and shares his journey to the US

Displaced Dinners place setting.

When Lutfi Mohammed, 31, got off a 12-hour flight from Egypt at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, the person who was supposed to pick him up wasn’t there. So, he borrowed a phone from a policeman, called a friend for the address of where he was supposed to go, and then hailed a taxi. He had $70 in his pocket. The cab ride was $90.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Welcome To The 2017 Industrial Evolution

It’s time for tech to disrupt global warming

After years of negotiation, 195 countries finally adopted the Paris Agreement last December, legally obligating each nation to dedicate themselves to climate change mitigation. It was generally seen as a great victory—though still symbolic—in the fight against global warming, as we’re years from seeing worldwide action, not to mention tangible results. While we wait for large-scale change, desire on an individual level to “do our part” continues to swell. We recycle, buy environmentally responsible goods, and bike to work a few times a week. But these one-off actions, though they may make us feel great, can only go so far in actively disrupting the trajectory of climate change.

Two-thirds of man-made global emissions come from the industrial sector. A 2013 study published in the journal Climate Change found 90 companies working in oil, gas, and concrete to be responsible for this lion’s share, meaning, if we want to stop climate change soon, we need these industries to overhaul their environmentally destructive production processes now. They’ll just need to get creative. Here are three promising technologies already in use that could forge the path of a smarter industrial future, which prove that progress isn’t as far-fetched as we think.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles