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How A Former Football Star Is Building An All-Solar City

The entire 17,000-acre property promises the kind of ground-up planning that can make suburbia green and sustainable.

Photo courtesy of Kitson Partners.

Just 15 miles northeast of Fort Myers, Florida, a massive array of glinting solar panels — 350,000 of them — stretch across land the size of 200 football fields. This futuristic array heralds the dawn of America’s all solar-powered city: Babcock Ranch. The new planned community, which just began to see residents moving in this year, comes complete with Alexa-powered smart homes offering 1-gigabit fiber internet, 50 miles of nature trails, community gardens, a K-8 charter school, farm-to-table organic food, and electric shuttles. The entire 17,000-acre property promises the kind of ground-up planning that can make suburbia green and sustainable.

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How Wartime Rationing Led To Nutella And Other Comfort Foods

Scarcity created many food fads that still endure today.

Every Feb. 5, Nutella aficionados worldwide take to social media to celebrate World Nutella Day, composing songs, hosting parties and posting pictures of the sinfully sumptuous hazelnut and chocolate spread on everything from pancakes to pizzas to pastries.

This year’s event was particularly notable, as the “Nutella riots” had surprised the world just 11 days earlier. A French grocery chain slashed Nutella prices by 70%, leading to brawls, injuries, and an “orgy” of shopping madness. The uproar was so extreme that the French government began an investigation to see if consumer laws for discounting merchandise had been broken.

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How A Florida Wildlife Biologist Became One Of The Greenest Mayors In America

He’s busy trying to protect his vulnerable city from the changes that are already assailing it.

South Miami mayor Philip Stoddard addresses the media prior to the release of the Wolbachia-infected male mosquitoes in South Miami. Photo by Photo by Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images.

There are 392 “climate mayors” in America today, all dedicated to upholding the Paris treaty’s goals for reducing our carbon footprint. They represent nearly 70 million Americans, and their cities are making strides toward ambitious goals to reduce greenhouse emissions. South Miami mayor and wildlife biologist Philip Stoddard is one of the most outspoken and active among them. He’s the guy who said that Sen. Marco Rubio was “an idiot,” that Florida’s “sugar barons have bought themselves a government, and that Florida’s major utility, Florida Power & Light, was “ an evil genius.” He once stood in his jungle-green backyard talking about climate change to actor Jack Black for National Geographic’s “ Years of Living Dangerously.”

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