GOOD

This Curriculum Could Help Students Compete In A Global World. So Why Aren’t More Schools Adopting It?

With the resurgence of sentiments like “America first,” teaching a global perspective in schools is crucial for American students.

As college-bound American students prepare for high school, they often must choose between several arduous paths. Do they begin self-selecting into advanced placement courses in the hopes of taking as many as humanly possible? Do they purposely choose easier electives in order to focus on a STEM-heavy academic path? Or do they aim to do it all: sacrificing sleep and social lives to become the ideal competitive college applicant with a long list of extracurricular activities, meaningful community service experiences, and all the honors courses their schedule will allow?

Currently, the traditional American educational system is built on multitasking, cramming in standards, and rushing through diploma requirements, which often leaves students stressed out and allows little room for personal reflection. Worse, in a system built around subject checkboxes, the “speed through 10th grade English so you can sign up for AP Literature” mentality creates no requirement or need to join humanities concepts with math skills or to see the world for what it is: a series of infinite problems, desires, and questions that connects each human to another. While we don’t live in a vacuum, most American schools are not currently preparing students to think and live in a global world.

Keep Reading Show less
Education

The Beats And Rhymes Of Hip-Hop Are Changing How We Design Our Cities

Young urban planners are remixing tracks from artists like Nas and turning them into skylines.

From Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five rapping in their 1982 classic “New York New York” about “Staring at a skyscraper reaching into heaven / When over in the ghetto I’m livin’ in hell,” to Jay Z rhyming on 2017’s “Marcy Me” that “I’m from Marcy Houses, where the boys die by the thousand,” hip-hop has always had an intimate relationship with the architecture of cities. But what if the low-income youth of color who live in the ghettos and housing projects of Gotham — or Los Angeles or Detroit — had the technical know-how to redesign their hometowns and create buildings that serve their communities?

[quote position="left" is_quote="true"]Places and spaces determine our culture.[/quote]

Keep Reading Show less
Education

What Colleges Really Think About How Teens Spend The Summer

An admissions counselor weighs in on the choice between taking classes and work.

A summer job bagging groceries at the local supermarket or flipping burgers at a fast food joint used to be rite of passage for teenagers. For some students, the cash they earned would go toward buying clothes or tickets to a blockbuster at the multiplex. Others would deposit their paychecks into a college savings account, putting funds aside for when they’d need to buy books and supplies on campus.

[quote position="left" is_quote="true"]Colleges don’t over-value experiences that can only be bought.[/quote]

Keep Reading Show less
Education