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One $500 Shirt Could Soon Change The Way You Look At Pollution

”It starts a conversation on how to cohabitate with pollution”

More than 80 percent of urban dwellers live with air quality that far exceeds the World Health Organization’s safety limits, with the vast majority of citizens living in blissful ignorance that as air quality declines, the risk of serious illnesses like stroke, lung cancer, and heart disease goes up. But a new line of pollution-detecting shirts called Aerochromics might just have the potential to change our behavior.

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Meet Zhala, the Queer Kurdish Pop Singer Taking the Swedish Music Scene By Storm

Robyn’s protege is a human rights advocate who packs a powerful beat, giving the homogenous Scandi-dance genre a run for its money.

Zhala performs in Norway, image courtesy of Nadja Sayej.

Zhala is not your typical pop singer. Dubbed the “Kurdish Lady Gaga,” this Stockholm-born musician has strong ethnic ties. Her mother fought in Peshmerga, the Iraqi Kurdi military, before fleeing to Sweden in the 1980s. Zhala’s father lives in Iraqi Kurdistan. Every time she visits him she’s heard “some sort of gunshots going on.” For the 27-year-old artist, politics has always been an inherent force in her music and defending Kurdistan has been a survival instinct.

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From Russia, With Facebook: Recycle Group Elevates Social Media Obsession to a Religious Devotion

How a new media arts collective from the east is creating tomorrow’s archaeological relics.

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With all of Russia’s recent bad press, its nascent modern art scene frequently gets overlooked. One of the most popular forces spearheading the cultural push is the Recycle Group, a Russian arts collective founded by sculptor Andrey Blokhin and his creative partner Georgy Kuznetsov. Together, their work juxtaposes new media fads and obsessions with traditional religious iconography, the sacred with the silly, a practice which so far has caused the duo much less grief than their fellow country (wo)men in Pussy Riot. One of their most famous projects, Holy WiFi (2013), had the pair carving the ubiquitous Wi-Fi symbol into black marble, and is just one of the many examples in which the group makes distinct comments regarding technology as a new media “higher power.” Their work is also simply just fascinating to look at.

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Are Non-Tacky Light Shows the Future of Electronic Music?

The DJ-behind-a-laptop formula just isn’t cutting it anymore.

It was like watching a coloring book come to life. For Art’s Birthday last January, Prague-based music-light duo ®udi22 played at the Papírna art space in Pilsen, Czech Republic.

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The Cyborg Who Stole The Armory Show

Technologically-enhanced artist who can hear color schedules cheeky performance at the famed New York art world event.

Cyborg artist Neil Harbisson was diagnosed at 11 with a rare form of color blindness called achromatopsia: he could only see in shades of gray. Now, he’s the first person in the world to have a cybernetic antenna drilled into his skull that gives him trippy privileges—sound and visuals are interchangeable. He can see electronic music in rainbow hues (without drugs) and can hear paintings by Andy Warhol. Talk about a stimulating advantage.

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