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Trump May Be The Reason More Students Are Choosing Historically Black Colleges And Universities

“The atmosphere at HBCUs offer a space for students to grow and learn without necessarily having to factor that into their college experiences. It’s a safe space in a time where safety concerns and racial tension cannot be denied.”

Thurgood Marshall. Oprah Winfrey. Toni Morrison. Spike Lee. Martin Luther King Jr. These are just some of the notable graduates of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), which are home to many of the nation’s most brilliant scholars. HBCU graduates have not only shaped the course of history, but today, these institutions produce 90% of the nation’s black science and technology graduates, half of the nation’s black teachers, and approximately 20% of black graduates.

While HBCUs play a vital role in educating the next generation of leaders (both black and non-black), historically black institutions have struggled over the years to receive necessary federal and private funding to help them compete with other universities. Still, enrollment has increased over the last three decades.

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Education

It’s Time To Reimagine The Juvenile Justice System, Once And For All

“Jail can kill the spirit of many young people. It could be argued that it’s designed to do that.”

It’s no secret: Rikers Island is one of the worst jails in America. Mother Jones says it “has it all: inmate violence, staff brutality, rape, abuse of adolescents and the mentally ill, and one of the nation’s highest rates of solitary confinement.” Though its appalling reputation is well-known throughout New York, the world was introduced to its horrors through a critically-acclaimed documentary on Kalief Browder, a former Bronx high schooler who took his own life in 2015 after being imprisoned, beaten, and tortured at the jail for three years without ever being convicted — or even tried — for a crime.

Browder’s heartbreaking story is tragic, but it’s sadly not unusual. It also doesn’t have to be replicated if we begin to reimagine how we treat children in the system. New York is only one of two states in the U.S. that allows youths ages 16-17 to be prosecuted and incarcerated as adults, despite research that suggests that before the age of 20 the decision-making section of the brain is not fully developed and that people under 18 are more amenable to treatment than adults.

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Education