GOOD

Water Cycle With a Human Twist

Earlier this spring, a group of students from the Stanford Graduate School of Business took a trip through California and Nevada. Their mission: to investigate water. The trip began in Sacramento with a tour of the Delta, following the flow of water south. The group visited agricultural communities in the San Joaquin Valley, then continued down to Los Angeles and Orange County, to learn more about urban water use and corporate water management—finally examining Nevada's water use through the lens of Las Vegas.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Earlier this spring, a group of students from the Stanford Graduate School of Business took a trip through California and Nevada. Their mission: to investigate water. The trip began in Sacramento with a tour of the Delta, following the flow of water south. The group visited agricultural communities in the San Joaquin Valley, then continued down to Los Angeles and Orange County, to learn more about urban water use and corporate water management—finally examining Nevada's water use through the lens of Las Vegas.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles



Earlier this spring, a group of students from the Stanford Graduate School of Business took a trip through California and Nevada. Their mission: to investigate water. The trip began in Sacramento with a tour of the Delta, following the flow of water south. The group visited agricultural communities in the San Joaquin Valley, then continued down to Los Angeles and Orange County, to learn more about urban water use and corporate water management—finally examining Nevada's water use through the lens of Las Vegas.

Along the way, the group met with policymakers, corporate executives, nonprofit leaders, water managers, and farmers. Students investigated ecosystem protection, water economics and markets, wastewater treatment and recycling, water infrastructure, the water-energy nexus, water quality issues, corporate water footprinting, and climate change, to name but a few.

Here is the first installment of what they found.

Tap or mineral water? All of us on the trip make a point of carrying our refillable water bottles around as we go. For us, it's the least we can do after seeing Chris Jordan's pictures of the albatross chicks on Midway Atoll, a stretch of sand in the North Pacific.

With the ocean as their feeding ground, albatross parents pick up plastic junk that looks to them like food, bringing it back to feed their young. Every year, on this diet of human trash, tens of thousands of them die from choking, starvation, and toxicity.

We certainly wouldn't want our plastic bottle caps to be responsible for killing one more albatross, would we? But despite all of that, the water bottle has become our new friend. Here's why:

Keep Reading Show less
Articles