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The Moral Obligation to Fight Against All Odds: Bill McKibben's Keynote Speech From Power Shift

At the massive gathering of young climate activists in the capital, Bill McKibben lets everyone know that their efforts are noble, but not optional.

During his Saturday night keynote at Power Shift 2011, the gathering of 10,000 young climate activists in Washington D.C., 350.org founder Bill McKibben gave a fiery speech about the moral importance of taking strong action right now, in the face of such daunting odds. Here's a video and transcript. -Ben Jervey

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdF8wz4Jwm8&feature=player_embedded

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Why We're Merging to Form a Climate Change Supergroup

1Sky and 350.org, two of the nation's most influential climate change organizations, merged today. Here, their leaders explain why.

This morning, two powerhouse climate change advocacy organizations, 1Sky and 350.org, announced they would be merging. This is a guest post written by occasional contributor Bill McKibben, chair of 350.org, and Betsy Taylor, former chair of 1Sky. —Ben Jervey

If you spend a little time as an environmentalist, one thing you’ll hear eventually from friends and family: “I wish there weren’t so many groups. It’s confusing—I don’t know who to volunteer for. Wouldn’t it work better if you all got together?”

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Money Pollution: The Chamber of Commerce Darkens the Skies

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is a front for the biggest corporations and polluters. Small businesses are saying "the chamber doesn't speak for me."


In Beijing, they celebrate when they have a “blue sky day,” when, that is, the haze clears long enough so that you can actually see the sun. Many days, you can’t even make out the next block.

Washington, by contrast, looks pretty clean: white marble monuments; broad, tree-lined avenues; the beautiful, green spread of the Mall. But its inhabitants—at least those who vote in Congress—can’t see any more clearly than the smoke-shrouded residents of Beijing.

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