GOOD

Three Ways to Make a Difference For Public Education in 2014

The most important thing we can do to restore equal opportunity in our nation is strengthen public education.


It's been a little over five years since a financial crisis pushed our economy to the brink of disaster. Thankfully we didn't fall into the abyss, but the recovery hasn't been equally shared among all Americans. While long term unemployment remains perilously high and middle class families struggle to pay their bills, a fortunate few enjoy unprecedented prosperity.

It's not our imagination; inequality in America really is growing wider. In fact, the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality recently reported that the U.S. now ranks third among all advanced nations in the level of income inequality. This dangerous trend threatens our country's stability and one of our most important valuesour commitment to equal opportunity for every person. That's why President Obama recently called inequality the most serious threat to the American Dream.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

No Child Left Behind? How About 'No Kid Hungry'?

By rethinking school breakfast, we can set our students on a higher achieving path and make no kid hungry a reality.

Hunger affects one in five children in America, and the problem often plays out in the classroom. Hungry children struggle to concentrate in class, visit the school nurse with daily headaches and stomach aches, and may act out because their stomachs are growling. The problem is so severe teachers spend $37 a month and principals spend $59 a month, on average, buying food for hungry students.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Why the Common Core Could Bring the End of One-Size-Fits-All Learning

Overly standardized learning isn't working for anymore. The Common Core State Standards could be the answer.

Data surrounds us. It is everywhere in our daily lives—all day, every day. From business and politics to health care, we take it on faith that more data will help us perform better and make smarter decisions. In education, however, that faith has overreached reality. Over the past decade we have increasingly relied on standardized test results to judge students, teachers, and schools, but we still haven't created assessments that give a fully accurate picture of student learning.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles