GOOD

Best of 2012: Ten Ways This Year Was Made by the Crowd

If 2011 was the year of the protester, 2012 was the year of the crowd.

If 2011 was the year of the protester, 2012 was the year of the crowd. From the passage of the JOBS act to the first million-dollar projects on Kickstarter, the creative force behind this year's most novel innovations wasn’t venture capitalists or big-time entrepreneurs—it was you. This was the year the burgeoning maker movement met the maturing social web to empower a new generation of designers, engineers and makers to bring innovative new products to market in an entirely new way.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Handheld Poverty Fighters: Building the Killer Apps of Global Prosperity

Among many of those in the development space, connective technologies are either the cheat code to global prosperity or a false prophet.

Among many in the development space, connective technologies are either the cheat code to global prosperity or a false prophet obscuring the real challenges affecting the world’s poor. Officials as high-ranking as Secretary Hillary Clinton have called the spread of cheap cell phones and laptops a driving force against poverty even as many of their most promising applications are failing to deliver on scale. Regardless of which camp you belong to, its hard to ignore the fact that even the poorest citizens have access to mobile technology and we are more connected than ever before.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Why Smart Entrepreneurs Aren't Eyeing the First World

It's presumptuous to think that emerging market consumers will want the same things we do or that their adoption patterns will mimic ours.

Though you may not hear it talked about much in the debates this election or see it on the front page of The New York Times, we are living through the greatest transformation in the history of modern capitalism. In the next 15 years, the number of people in the consuming class will double and, for the first time ever, emerging markets will spend more, in real numbers, than the developed economies combined.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles