GOOD

Point and Shoot: Is It Legal to Take Pictures of Factory Farms?

As authorities in Florida try to make taking photos of farms illegal, James Reeves traces the law's Red Scare roots and offers some legal tips.

People get nervous when they don't know why you're taking a picture of something. Pointing a camera at the Statute of Liberty is understandable. Taking a photo of a barge or some pilings in the East River attracts authorities. This anxiety is not just a feature of cities. Speeding through Utah one evening, I saw the beautiful skeleton of a wrecked cement mixer on the horizon, backlit by the sun setting beneath the blank Salt Flats. I pulled onto the shoulder of the empty highway with my camera ready to flash. Two minutes later, a man in sunglasses in a black jeep with tinted windows was hollering at me, demanding my camera.

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Food for Thinkers: Panic In Aisle Five

Feedlots and chicken fried steak: James Reeves on the moral grey zone at the heart of his relationship with food.

James Reeves is a man with a passion for Panda Express, a professional interest in the Divine Right of Louisiana Fishers regarding riparian servitudes, and an abiding regret for the terrible coffee he sold as a teenage gas station attendant. He is also a writer, designer, teacher, and partner at Civic Center, whose first book, The Road to Somewhere: An American Memoir, will be published by W. W. Norton in July 2011. I read his blog, Big American Night, and follow him on Twitter, and was delighted when he agreed to join in Food for Thinkers week.

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