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Wireless Cities are Coming: Get Ready to Ditch Your Power Cords

WiTricity Corp. is harnessing Tesla's inventions to power cities wirelessly


Here’s a bold prediction for you: very soon, we’ll live in a wireless world. This is where you’re probably thinking, “Hold your sweet-smartphonin’-butt there mister.... We already live in a wireless world.” One could argue—given our network of mobile phone, towers, and satellites—that we’ve now effectively transitioned enough of our communications infrastructure away from the wire that we can deem ourselves “wireless." However, in fact, we are not a wireless world. One significant tether still remains: the mighty power cord.

Our global system of satellites, antennas, and batteries allow us to take our mobile tools on the road and exchange information wirelessly for impressive lengths of time. Sooner or later however, every indulgent reprieve we take from the world’s largest tangle is met with insistent indicator lights, panicked beeping, and a cacophony of calls to plug something in.

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The phenomenon of “vampire draw” or “vampire load” or “vampire power” or “Kristen Stewart wall lightning” has been covered often and covered well here and by other forward-thinking, energy-conscious, media outlets. Therefore, for the benefit of readers who may be unfamiliar with the phrase, I’ll only give this abbreviated summary of the phenomenon before moving on: vampire draw is the pet name for the electrical power your electronics consume when they are switched off. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that the average American household is wasting $100 worth of energy per year—a small amount per household, but collectively a gigantic waste of vital resources.

If you’d like to save money and energy by combatting this phenomenon, read this article here or do a web search for “vampire load”—without giggling. Your search will be handsomely rewarded.

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Build a Better Home with These Alternative Construction Methods

One summer during high school I worked a seasonal landscaping job. The crew was made up of unskilled lawnmower jockeys—like myself—and skilled tradesmen who, for one reason or another, found themselves temporarily unable to work in their trade. I once asked a new member of the team what he did for a living. He chuckled derisively and said, “I slap together toothpicks wrapped in plastic.”

One summer during high school I worked a seasonal landscaping job. The crew was made up of unskilled lawnmower jockeys—like myself—and skilled tradesmen who, for one reason or another, found themselves temporarily unable to work in their trade. I once asked a new member of the team what he did for a living. He chuckled derisively and said, “I slap together toothpicks wrapped in plastic.”

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