GOOD

If Football Is Deadly, Why Do We Still Watch?

New research finds brain trauma in 87% of players.

Right in the middle of football’s biggest party week, the 2017 Super Bowl, there was more tragic news on the head injury front. Ken Stabler, the flamboyant Oakland Raiders quarterback who led his team to a Super Bowl victory in January 1977, was found to have had brain disease – chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE – when he died of colon cancer last July.

It was saddening to learn of the latest National Football League great to have suffered from the illness but not shocking. Hall of Famers Frank Gifford and Junior Seau are just two of a growing list of former players who developed the disease, as confirmed the only way now possible – through an autopsy.

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Sports

What Happened To The Openly Gay Athlete?

Male athletes aren’t coming out at the professional level.

From late April 2013 to early May 2014, gay and lesbian athletes welcomed breakthrough after breakthrough in the historically closeted world of sports.

Journeyman basketball center Jason Collins came out as gay and later signed a contract with the Brooklyn Nets, making him the first openly gay player to get into a regular-season game in the NBA, NFL, NHL, or MLB.

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Sports

Don’t Run (And Don’t Laugh): The Little-Known History Of Racewalking

A crash course on a much-maligned sport that has been part of the Olympic Games since 1904

Race-walkers turn a corner, keeping one foot on the ground, during the women’s 20-km event at the 2012 London Olympics.

While it was a huge sporting event in the United States in the years after the Civil War and was an early Olympic event, race-walking has been regarded for decades as something of a joke—at least in America. An episode of the sitcom “Malcolm in the Middle” was devoted to poking fun at it. The NCAA doesn’t hold a race-walking championship. Sports broadcaster Bob Costas once compared it to a contest to see who could whisper the loudest.

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Sports