GOOD

New App Could Tackle Hunger, Will Help You Find a Good Deal

PareUp wants to connect food purveyors to thrifty consumers looking to score deals on unused, but still edible, items.

Try to stomach this: more than 30 percent of the U.S. food supply went uneaten in 2010. According to a U.S. Department of Agriculture study released earlier this year, that's 133 billion pounds—$160 billion worth of breakfasts, lunches, snacks, and dinners—that ended up in dumpsters instead of bellies.

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

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Learning to Farm Fish Responsibly

Breakthroughs in aquaculture are winning over longtime skeptics.

Illustration by Tyler Hoehne

For years, wildlife organizations and international agencies have been warning that overfishing is rapidly depleting ocean fish stocks. Because the global fishing fleet is estimated to be three times larger than our oceans can sustain, the populations of big fish—tuna, swordfish, cod, marlin, and others—have declined by 90 percent since 1950. If this trend continues, populations of all food-specific species could theoretically collapse by 2048. And that’s where fish farming comes in. Though the downsides of traditionally farmed fish are numerous and well-documented—disease, environmental damage, nutritional degradation, habitat destruction, antibiotic use, and forage fish depletion among them—some innovative aquaculture models are now carving out new, non-destructive means of farming fish, and winning over longtime skeptics.

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