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Young Activists Care About Race, Gender, and the Economy—But Not the Election

A new report reveals Millennials want social change, but don't believe the election can make it happen.



A new report from the Applied Research Center concludes that young progressive activists care about racial justice, class divides, and gender issues. They're worried about widespread ignorance, complacency, and the danger of unchecked capitalism. They also don't have much faith in Obama—or much use for the upcoming election.

The report was compiled using information from several focus groups of progressive activists in Portland, Oakland, Atlanta, Baltimore, and New York. The ARC chose participants (about half of them white, half people of color) with "experience as a paid employee, volunteer, or small donor of a social justice or community organization," or who had participated in the Occupy movement.

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Married People Are Happier—Maybe Because We Make Singles Hate Themselves

A new study finds marriage prevents unhappiness as we age. But is our society working to make singles sadder?


In what might be the most depressing study about marriage on record, Michigan State University scientists found that married people aren't any happier than they were when they were single—but tying the knot may protect them against slowly growing unhappier. The long-ranging study relied on thousands of participants to find that single people's happiness gradually declines over the years, while married people's satisfaction just levels off.

Happiness averages like these tend to erase the more complicated demographic details—satisfaction surely fluctuates based on the age and income at which people marry, along with why they get married, how many times they do it, whether they stay that way, and whether their marriages are actually functional. But let's say this data really does show that matrimony generally staves off unhappiness later in life. Is it any wonder, given how our society treats aging singles?

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Five Moments Teen Pop Stars Became Sex Symbols

In honor of Justin Bieber's post-puberty rebrand, here are some top moments of teen stars owning their sexual awakenings.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4GuqB1BQVr4

On March 1, Justin Bieber turned 18 years old, and a few weeks later, he released his single, "Boyfriend." The song offers the same fantasy as always—he just wants a girlfriend to cuddle, and that girl is you, baby—but this time, the Biebs sounds smoky, breathy, seductive, wheedling while semi-rapping about fondue and swag over a stripped-down beat. His lyrics say "love," but his voice says "sex." In the song's video (a pretty blatant Timberlake knock-off), he's a mere shadow of his former self. Gone is the cheesy smile, the purple hoodie, the video games. Instead, there's lip-licking, waist-grabbing, and a scantily clad girl—no, woman—sitting atop his very, very fancy car. A new GQ profile calls out this calculated reinvention for what it is: part hormones, part rebrand.

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Companies Value Internships—So Why Don't They Hire Interns?

There's a fundamental disconnect between internship theory and practice.


As recently as the 1980s, internships were uncommon and certainly not required for entry-level jobs. Nowadays, they represent a rite of passage for three-quarters of the 10 million students enrolled in America’s four-year colleges and universities. And according to a recent study by Millennial Branding, Inc., the lion's share of employers expect students to have internships on their résumés; 91 percent of the 225 employers surveyed think students should have between one and two internships before they graduate.

Yet the study found that half of those employers haven't hired any interns in the past six months, revealing a fundamental disconnect between internship theory and practice. A couple decades ago, interns may have expected to at least get hired by the same company for whom they gave up their summers. But today, some companies apparently only want interns in the abstract.

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The Personalized Campaign: How Democrats Are Selling Two Different Obamas

The "first Internet president" has a major thing going for him—the ability to individualize the voter's experience.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K86sztC1ZUs

The 2012 election season has officially begun, and like every incumbent, Obama and his campaign need to sell two Baracks: one for the base, and one for the swing voters. But a lot has changed since the last incumbent ran back in 2004. The digital divide has never been sharper. Personalization is the new curation, thanks to YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, and all the rest. And judging by Obama's first few major campaign moves, he's going to take full advantage of the opportunity to tailor his message to his audience.

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