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The Brand That Feeds: Balancing Personal and Professional on Social Media

Regardless of how you start using social tools at work, it can quickly become endlessly complicated to use them as a civilian.


In February 2011, Andy Carvin posted around 400 tweets a day. Over the course of several months, Carvin, a journalist at NPR, took to the 140-character service to verify and reshare on-the-ground reports of the revolutions that rocked the Middle East—earning himself the accurate, if cringe-worthy, title of “the man who tweets revolutions.”

Carvin joined Twitter in 2007, a year after the service launched, with an update about watching his daughter play. Which shouldn’t have made it surprising that even as he worked tirelessly to capture Arab Spring, he shared the occasional personal update, or family photo. Yet people were upset that he mixed the personal and professional—he got a handful of @-replies saying the sharing of mundane personal details was inappropriate.

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Hating on the Ladies: The Real Backlash Against Pinterest

Social media criticism should focus on whether a service works, not the people who use it.

I don’t use Pinterest. In fact, when I first learned about the service, I mocked it. But in recent weeks, I’ve been surprised at the level of nasty internet backlash over what is essentially a bookmarking service for content that can be presented via jpg. And I've noticed that Pinterest’s critics tend to harp on one particular aspect of the service.

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Ballet Is the New Yoga

It's a different sort of balance.

I don't hate yoga. I liked it quite a lot when I learned it as an undergraduate at DePaul in Chicago. For my friends in the university's theater program, yoga was just another freshman rec they had to endure, and teaching me was a Friday night lark.

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