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5 Romance Tips From The World’s Most Famous Asexual

Step up your intimacy game with advice from a sexless relationship guru

David Jay

David Jay has been the world’s best-known “ace” (or asexual person) since he first launched the Asexuality and Visibility Education Network (AVEN) in 2001, after his online search for information about asexuality turned up results about amoebas—and nothing about humans. Today, AVEN boasts more than 82,000 members, the DSM-5 has stopped categorizing human asexuality as a disorder, and the general public appears to be relatively comfortable recognizing aces like Jay, along with heteroromantic demisexuals, panromantic gray-asexuals, and others with a fluid sexual identity. (For a little perspective, compare Joy Behar’s attitude toward Jay on a 2006 segment of The Viewin which she insists that he’s actually “repressed” or “lazy”—to a recent Buzzfeed video called “Ask an Asexual Person.”)

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This App Will Tell You if Your Job Posting is Sexist

If we want to #changetheratio, let’s start with how we talk to our ideal job candidates.

To figure out why there are only men on this panel at a 2013 tech summit, we might want to start by looking at the way the jobs they applied for were described. Image via Flickr user William Murphy (cc).

Programmer Kat Matfield has designed a free tool called the Gender Decoder to analyze job advertisements for subtle gender bias. Matfield says she was motivated by her “frustration at the gap between theory on bias and practical steps people can take to counter it.”

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Russia Bans ‘Communist Monopoly’ for Its Anti-Soviet Views

Authorities won’t let people buy a game about shopping under an authoritarian regime.

Image via ipn.gov.pl

“Upon opening the box, you have entered 1980s Poland.” The instructions for the Polish board game Kolejka (“Queue,” or “Line Up”) explicitly ask players to imagine what it was like to be lost within the logistical maze of a communist regime. This past weekend, Russia banned Kolejka for its perceived anti-Soviet tendencies—though the game has been out for four years, and Russia hasn’t been Soviet in any official capacity for more than 20.

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