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What Chernobyl's Wildlife Can Teach Humans

As more nuclear power plants are built around the globe, understanding the effects of radiation is essential

Wild horses running in Chernobyl's Exclusion Zone (Getty Images)

The 1,000-square mile exclusion zone surrounding the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant has remained virtually free from human intrusion for the last 30 years—ever since the landscape was blanketed in lethal levels of radiation following a catastrophic meltdown. The years since have seen a gradual rewilding of the area, with nature reclaiming the ghost town surrounding the defunct plant, and animals large and small moving into the surrounding forests. Headlines trumpet that the wildlife is “thriving,” “flourishing,” and ruling the landscape.

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Women Astronauts Struggle To Break Earth’s Glass Ceiling

Interstellar progress is slow to come

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Gender imbalance isn’t something limited to earthly realms such as computer science, physics and aviation. Its nefarious reach also extends into outer space. Just look at the stats: of the 540 people who have journeyed out of this world, only a measly 11 percent were women. Nearly all of them—50 of 59—were in NASA (USA! USA!). But don’t get too excited—that’s still less than 20 percent of the total number of people that the agency has sent to space since 1961.

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Fighting The War On Trash

Cops seriously cracking down on jerks who litter

Around the world, warming weather brings picnics, festivals, walks in the park—and garbage. Lots and lots of garbage. Refuse tossed by outdoors-goers, too lazy to clean up after themselves (or too dizzy from sunshine and day-drinking), costs millions each year. That tally also includes dog owners—for whom there is a special place reserved in hell—who do not pick up their pooches’ poo.

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Pigeons Wearing Backpacks Are Helping Save London

The disrespected “rats with wings” are helping combat excessive pollution in the heart of Britain

In London, toy drones aren’t the oddest spectacle floating overhead. The keen eye may spy a pigeon with a backpack.

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A look at the monstrous amount of whey that can come from cheese production.

The French are stylishly tackling food waste with a picturesque new power plant, high in the Alps, that converts cheese waste to electricity. Located in the quaint Alpine town of Albertville, the plant will use Beaufort cheese whey—a liquid produced during the cheesemaking process that often winds up in the garbage—to fuel biogas reactors. The resulting gas will be enough to power a community of around 1,500 people, reports the Telegraph.

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