GOOD

San Francisco Deems Apple Computers Not Green Enough to Buy

Apple seems to be moving away from green devices, and San Francisco has taken notice, announcing that city agencies will stop buying Apple computers.

Just when you thought Apple was really starting to go green—announcing plans to power its newest data center largely with renewable energy—the tech company took a big step backward last week, requesting that all of its products be removed from EPEAT, a registry of environmentally friendly electronics. What’s really strange is that Apple helped start EPEAT back in 2006, and now it’s just backing out without much of an explanation.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Networks Catching on to Link Between Climate Change, Extreme Weather

The evening news broadcasts on CBS, NBC, and ABC all discussed the connection between climate change and extreme weather on Tuesday night.

Remember when we told you last week that several major media outlets were completely dropping the ball by failing to mention the link between extreme weather events and climate change? Well, the media has finally started to get its act together—or at least the three major networks have. In a stunning turnaround Tuesday night, the evening news broadcasts on CBS, NBC, and ABC all discussed the fact that climate change is probably responsible for a lot of the extreme weather we’ve been seeing recently.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

What Causes Phantom Smartphone Buzzing?

You know the feeling—you think your phone is buzzing in your pocket, you go to see what’s up, and there’s nothing there. Why does it happen?

If you’re addicted to your smartphone, you probably don’t need to have the concept of “phantom vibration” explained to you. You know the feeling—you think your phone is buzzing in your pocket, you go to see what’s up, and you discover that there’s nothing there. You simply imagined the vibration. Does that mean you’re spending too much time obsessing over your smartphone? Well, probably. But at least you’re not alone: one study conducted at a medical center found that 68 percent of the staff had experienced phantom vibrations, and now some scientists are trying to explain its causes.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Oakland Getting First Urban Network of CO2 Sensors

Oakland's extensive network of CO2 detectors should help us figure out whether California's new cap-and-trade system is working.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Wales Managed to Double Its Recycling Rate in Just a Few Years

Wales recycled 48 percent of its household waste this year, more than double its recycling rate in 2005. Apparently progress is possible after all.

In 2005, the United States recycled 32.1 percent of its household waste—far better than Wales, which recycled only 23.1 percent of household waste in 2005-06. But between 2005 and 2010—the most recent year for which statistics are available—the U.S. recycling rate increased rather sluggishly, from 32.1 percent to 34.1 percent. Wales, meanwhile, just announced that its 2011-12 recycling rate was a remarkable 48 percent—more than double what it was six years ago. So what gives? What has Wales done since 2005 that we haven’t?

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Colombia Has 100 Tiny Libraries in Public Parks

Forget your worries about the future of print for a second and admire Colombia's charming outdoor reading centers.

It’s no secret that ink-and-paper books are going out of style, mostly due to the rise of e-readers but also because fewer people are reading in general. And considering that the print book industry is pretty bad for the environment, maybe that trend isn't all bad. Still, not all is lost for fans of old-fashioned books—especially in Colombia, where tiny public libraries are operated out of parks all over the country.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles