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Digital Boomtown: Online Learning Is on the Rise

A new report shows that the number of middle and high school students learning online has tripled over the past three years.

For today's middle and high school students, being online is nothing new—but there's a revolution happening when it comes to teens actually using the internet to learn. According to the just-released Learning in the 21st Century 2011 Trends report, the number of middle and high school students learning online is on the upswing and more than 40 percent of students now say online classes are an essential part of their school experience.

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Be Warned: Payday May Be Hazardous to Your Health

It's Friday, so watch out. People are more likely to die on payday or shortly after than at other times. We just want you to be safe.

So much of social science research is about finding data to back up what we already pretty much know through common sense. This study from Notre Dame however, uncovers some counter-intuitive findings.

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A College Degree in Three Years? Why America Needs to Get on Board

Three-year degree programs save money and help students get on with their lives, but American students aren't signing up. They should be.

You'd think that given the spiraling cost of college, American students would jump at the chance to finish up school in three years instead of the typical four. With a three-year accelerated degree, parents have to fork over less cash for tuition and room and board, the family's loan burden is lighter, and students can get on with their career plans earlier. How does this not make sense? But despite the best efforts of both public and private universities to promote accelerated programs, students are sticking with the four-year college tradition. That's too bad because a three-year degree is a smart idea that we should be adopting.

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Relationships, Not Police, Make Schools Safer

Patrolling campuses and patting down students isn't what ends the cycle of violence on campus.

It's pretty difficult for a student to focus on school work if he's worried about whether he's going to get beat up by gang members between classes. So, in pursuit of school safety in high-crime urban areas, most districts either have their own police force, or allow city police on middle and high school campuses—which, of course, ends up making students feel like they're being treated like third strikers.

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Why Teachers Shouldn't Be Expected to Talk About Bin Laden's Death

My fourth-grade son's teacher didn't talk about the killing of Osama bin Laden in class—and that was a good decision.

One of the first things my 10-year-old fourth grader said on Sunday night after we finished watching President Obama announce the killing of Osama Bin Laden was, "I wonder what my teacher will say about this at school tomorrow." I'm not surprised he thought that. After all, students spend most of their waking hours in classrooms, and teachers, and their opinions, are huge influences on them.

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