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The Only Black Kid in Class? Here's Why it Happens

"I don't even see you as black." That's number 10 on Buzzfeed's incredible list of "27 Things You Had to Deal With as the Only Black Kid in Your...


"I don't even see you as black." That's number 10 on Buzzfeed's incredible list of "27 Things You Had to Deal With as the Only Black Kid in Your Class," a list that's struck such a nerve across social media that Boston Globe political reporter Wesley Lowery tweeted about the reaction, "Buzzfeed has just won black Twitter."

Indeed, prominent political analyst and writer Zerlina Maxwell retweeted the list, adding the note, "THIS IS MY LIFE." And all across social media, black folks are commenting, "my biography," "story of my life," and "legit, my whole K-12 experience."

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Pilot Program Aims to Level the Advanced Placement Playing Field for Low-Income Students

The College Board, which administers AP exams, is bringing AP courses to 200 under-served high schools across California.


With college tuition skyrocketing, one good way for students to cut costs is to earn college credit through Advanced Placement courses and exams in high school. But not all schools offer the same number of AP classes, and poor kids of color tend to have the least access.

In an effort to remedy this inequity, the College Board, which administers AP exams, is launching the California AP Potential Expansion, a pilot program that will bring AP courses to 200 under-served high schools across the Golden State. Teachers will participate in an intensive summer training institute and receive ongoing professional development. Participating schools—which must commit to offering at least one new AP course for each of three years—will also receive funding for textbooks and course materials through nonprofit partnerships. The program will identify what the College Board calls "diamond-in-the-rough" students who might develop their potential in AP classes.

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One is an a la carte program of college level classes that's the traditional method for earning higher education credits for precocious high school students. The other is a two-year, well-rounded syllabus created in Switzerland and (at different points in its 40-plus year run) financed by UNESCO and the Gates Foundation, which is gaining steam. They are the Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate programs, respectively.

According to a recent blog post over at The Washington Post, schools, such as Colorado College, are allowing scores from either of their tests to replace the SAT and ACT in college admissions. But, because of its expense and affiliation with the United Nations and liberal ideologies, the IB faces some opposition.

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