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Worried You’re Breathing Polluted Air? There’s An App For That.

Wondering just what it is you’re inhaling? A new app should have you breathing a little easier.

image via (cc) flickr user infinitewilderness

We have smartphone apps to tell us where our friends are checking in for drinks, the best restaurant within walking distance, and even the quickest route to the nearest bathroom. But did you ever expect you’d be checking your phone to figure out the best place to take a deep breath? That’s exactly what entrepreneur Ziv Lautman would like you to do. Lautman is the co-creator of BreezoMeter, an app that tracks and displays real-time air quality reports, allowing users to see not only the cleanliness of what they’re breathing in, but also where in their city they can find cleaner, fresher air.

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Who Runs the World? Three Girls Sweep Google's Science Fair

Three young American women, Lauren Hodge, Naomi Shah and Shree Bose won Google's global science competition.


It turns out that when Beyoncé sings that girls run the world, she might be right. They're at least running the Google Science Fair world. On Tuesday three young American women, Lauren Hodge, Naomi Shah, and Shree Bose, smashed the stereotype that only boys are good at science and became the winners of Google's inaugural science competition.

The Google "judges said the unifying elements of all three young women were their intellectual curiosity, their tenaciousness and their ambition to use science to find solutions to big problems." They beat out "over 7,500 entries from more than 10,000 young scientists in over 90 countries around the world," and their projects are undeniably impressive.

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New Study Says Bad Air Makes for Bad Workers

CEOs take note: A compromised ability to breathe makes people less effective cogs in your profit machine.


We already know that the Clean Air Act and other pollution controls save money in averted health care costs. But all too often, polluters or the politicians in their pockets argue that implementing new pollution controls would hurt the economy.

On Think Progress, Matt Yglesias writes about a new report out of the National Bureau of Economic Research that adds a new twist to that debate. In “The Impact of Pollution on Worker Productivity" the authors find "robust evidence" that ozone levels—one of the most common local pollutants—have a "significant impact on productivity." In other words, bad air quality makes workers less productive, thereby hurting business.

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