GOOD

America and Iran Settle Their Differences on the Robotic Soccer Field

If only all geopolitical conflicts could be handled by droids kicking soccer balls at each other.

image via (cc) flickr user eneas

If you’ve been following the news lately, you’ve probably heard a little something about the recent nuclear agreement between the United States and Iran—an agreement critics fear will clear a path for Iranian atomic weapons, and which advocates argue is a necessary diplomatic step to help direct both nations away from a violent confrontation. But while pundits and politicians around the world have spent the last several days debating the merits of the nuclear diplomacy, Iranian and U.S. representatives were busy duking it out in a very different type of arena: The robotic soccer field.

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F*ck Yeah America

Fact: the USA’s national parks are bigger in size than all of England.

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Explore the Surprising Faces of Debt In America

The Debt Project, a new series by photographer Brittany M. Powell, illuminates the real people behind the numbers.

Brittany Powell, The Debt Project

Hundreds of millions of Americans currently shoulder staggering debt that threatens to spiral them into financial insecurity. According to a recent study by the Federal Reserve, 1 in 50 households carry more than $20,000 in credit card debt, with the U.S. population as a whole owing more than 2.4 trillion. Of that inconceivable amount, $60 billion is from credit cards, at an average of $7,327 per household. This is not a faceless statistic. Many workers, still recovering from the seismic shock of the Great Recession, give over a sizable portion of their paycheck each month to cover these debts. In a shocking study commissioned by ProPublica and ADP, it was reported, “more than one in 10 employees in the prime working ages of 35 to 44 had their wages garnished in 2013.” Debt, the elephant in the room, is an insidious and often invisible force. Whether it’s from student loans, medical bills, credit cards, or real estate, the burden can feel so substantial that it almost seems like a physical presence in our lives. The Debt Project, a photo series by San Francisco-based photographer Brittany M. Powell, hopes to illuminate what debt really looks like by peering into the surroundings of those living beneath its weight. The result is a group of intimate photos, still under development, that show the real and often banal face of financial hardship.

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Seeing Things as They Could Be, Not as They Are

This past summer, I went on an epic train journey across America in the inspired company of 24 pioneering millennials. With the help of the GOOD community and about 1,000 individuals, they had crowdfunded their way on board with innovative projects focused on some our nation’s greatest challenges

This past summer, I went on an epic train journey across America in the inspired company of 24 pioneering millennials. With the help of the GOOD community and about 1,000 individuals, they had crowdfunded their way on board with innovative projects focused on some our nation’s greatest challenges. Our inaugural journey was an example of what can happen when diverse groups of people come together to support the aspirations of one generation. It was the first in a series of journeys run by our Millennial Trains Project, the next of which will venture from Los Angeles to Miami in March 2014.

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This is the promise of big data, and it's really cool looking.
Nelson Minar, an engineer working at Google, created this vector tile map of all the rivers in the U.S., based on a data from NHDPlus, a suite of application-ready geospatial data sets supported by the EPA.
Minar worked on the project for a few weeks, to experiment with vector maps, he wrote on his blog. But the finished product is so visually stunning it's been circulating the blogosphere.
The data is all available on the open source platform GitHub, so you can make your own rivers map.
Join us in our quest to Explore and Protect the GOOD Outdoors. Click here to say you'll Do It.\n

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