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UCLA Student's Anti-Asian YouTube Rant: Do Colleges Need Mandatory Diversity Classes?

UCLA junior Alexandra Wallace's anti Asian rant raises the question—should colleges teach how to work with people from diverse backgrounds?


A UCLA student is in hot water after filming a disturbing anti-Asian rant and posting it online. Last Friday, political science major Alexandra Wallace taped an almost three-minute video called "Asians in the Library," and over the weekend, it went viral on YouTube. In the video she attacks Asian students for everything from talking on their cell phones to having elderly relatives come visit. Although the university has condemned her tirade, the incident raises the question, what should colleges do foster a truly inclusive learning environment and prepare students for a diverse world?

Wallace complains about "these hordes of Asian people that UCLA accepts into our school every single year," and then bashes them for their so-called bad manners. She demonstrates her "good" American manners by insensitively criticizing Asian students who used the phone after the tsunami hit Japan saying, "I swear they're going through their whole families just checking on everybody from the tsunami thing."

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Do We Need College Scholarships for White Men?

A new Texas nonprofit says being male and white doesn't help you pay for college, so they're starting a scholarship program just for white men.


A Texas nonprofit's plan to offer five $500 scholarships to white men is putting conventional wisdom about white male privilege and the ability to pay for higher education in the spotlight. According to the Former Majority Association for Equality—named because white people are no longer the racial majority in Texas—being a white male isn't an asset when it comes to access to college scholarships because they don't "fit into certain categories or ethnic groups."

FMAE president Colby Bohannan served in the military in Iraq, but says that when he returned to Texas and hunted around for ways to pay for school, he felt left out because he isn't female or a member of a minority group. A low-income white male doesn't have, as Bohannan told CNN, "a bunch of money sitting around" to pay for college.

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