GOOD

Depressing New Report Connects TV Binge Watching With Depression

Watching hour after hour of the same TV show is linked to depression, lonliness, and impulse control issues.

image via (cc) flickr user alvi2047

It’s pretty well understood that watching a lot of television probably isn’t all that good for you, but that hasn’t stopped many of us from setting up camp on the sofa to bask in the cold electric glow of the TV for hours on end. A March 2014 Nielsen report determined that the average American spends five hours a day watching live TV, with plenty more screen time spent on computers, phones, and tablets. And now, thanks to streaming services like Netflix and Amazon, we can up our TV consumption to near-limitless amounts, with whole seasons – entire series, even – at our disposal. Yes, we’ve had DVD and VHS box sets for years, but those required switching the disc or cassette every few episodes – Now we’re able to absorb an entire show without ever having to get off the couch (bladder permitting).

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Americans Watched More TV Than Ever in 2010

The average American watched nearly 40 hours of television a week in 2010. And he watched a lot of Fox News and Univision.


It’s hard to imagine that, in an age when more people than ever are going to their computers, tablets, and smart phones for entertainment, television viewership would be at an all-time high. But new Nielsen data says that’s the case.

According to the nation's leading advertising research firm, the average American watched about 34 hours of broadcast network and basic cable programming every seven days in 2010—that's a 1-percent jump from the year prior and just six-hours short of a full-time workweek. Fox remained the most beloved station to the ever-lucrative 18-to-49 demographic, and eight of the 10 top telecasts were football games.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles