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Women Now Earning More Bachelor's and Graduate Degrees Than Men

You go, girl! Women are racking up the degrees in record numbers.


You go, girl! According to a new Census report released on Tuesday, Educational Attainment in the United States: 2010, more adults over the age of 25 than ever—30 percent—have bachelor's degrees. And women are out-achieving men when it comes to earning both bachelor's and advanced degrees (as I noted before, some schools even have affirmative action programs for men).

Women began outnumbering men in college enrollment in the early 1980s, and since 1996, they've earned more bachelor's degrees. Data from this latest report shows that for adults aged 25 to 29, 36 percent of women have earned a bachelor's degree or more, compared with only 28 percent of men. But this is the first year women are earning more advanced degrees than their male counterparts. Only a decade ago, men held the majority, 55.4 percent, of advanced degrees. According to the current data, 10,685,000 working women over 25 hold master's degrees, law degrees, doctoral degrees, and other other graduate degrees, compared to only 10,562,000 men. However, there's still room for improvement. Women still lag behind in business, science, and engineering graduate degrees.

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Rejected From College: If You're a Woman, A Less-Qualified Man Probably Took Your Spot

Men are getting a leg up in the admissions game, all in favor of "gender balance."


With college acceptance letters hitting mailboxes in full force this month, high school seniors are either celebrating being accepted to their dream school, or learning to love the idea of attending a safety school. But, for female students rejected from private liberal arts institutions, that rejection might have happened precisely because they're female. Yes, so-called male affirmative action continues to roll on in private college admissions, and it's all, supposedly, in pursuit of gender balance.

The issue first came to the forefront back in 2006 in "To All the Girls I've Rejected" a New York Times op-ed by Kenyon College dean of admissions and financial aid Jennifer Britz. Britz described the real angst of sitting in a room of admissions officers rejecting women in favor of sometimes less-stellar male applicants all because of school's desire for gender balance. Women earn 57 percent of bachelor's degrees and, if admitted according to merit, they'd easily be two-thirds (or more) of the students on a given campus. Apparently, in pursuit of diversity, campuses don't want the student body to be more than 60 percent women.

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Will Daniel Craig's PSA Make Up for the Chauvinistic Bond Franchise?

For an International Women's Day PSA, Daniel Craig literally steps into a woman's shoes. The Bond franchise, we assume, won't change.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkp4t5NYzVM

Nobody would ever peg womanizing spy James Bond as an advocate for gender equality. But in this two-minute clip starring Daniel Craig as Bond and produced by the organization We Are Equals for the 100th annual International Women's Day, 007 gets totally schooled by "M" on the challenges women face—and spends half the clip dressed as a woman. It's a gutsy move to put such a chauvinistic character in drag, but there's no denying the impact of this one PSA is dwarfed by all the sexist gender biases and scantily-dressed "Bond Girls" that have been mainstays of the 22 Bond movies released to date. Perhaps this PSA a sign that Craig's planning to pressure the franchise's script writers to not include such biases and imagery in the upcoming Bond 23?

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