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Which Woman Will Be the Face of the New $10 Bill?

The last time a woman appeared on paper currency was 119 years ago. It’s time for change.

Image via Wikimedia

In 1785, the United States Congress adopted the dollar bill as America’s unit of currency. While Alexander Hamilton, Andrew Jackson, and Thomas Jefferson have since been featured, it’s been 119 years since a woman last appeared on paper currency. Just last night, the Treasury Department announced a startling change in policy: on the front of the $10 bill, they would put a woman.

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Seven-Year-Old’s Comic About Magical Afro-Puff Superhero Wins $16K Award

Natalie McGriff’s The Adventures of Moxie Girl is about a superhero who fights literacy.

Image via The Adventures of Moxie Girl's Facebook page.

The comic-book reading demographic of supergirls with superpower hair is criminally underserved, but not for long: Seven-year-old Natalie McGriff took home more than $16,000 after attending the “world’s largest crowdfunding festival” in Jacksonville, FL for her homemade comic, The Adventures of Moxie Girl, about a girl who has magical afro-puffs. McGriff’s mother, Angela Nixon, helped her pen the story of Moxie Girl, a black girl who hates her hair, until she uses a magical shampoo which gives her afro-puffs superpowers that help her fight illiteracy. When the Council of Monsters threatens to eat up Jacksonville Public Libraries, Moxie Girl fights them off with her kinky hair and saves the day.

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Morocco’s Biker Girl Gangs Featured In Colorful New Doc

Artist Hassan Hajjaj’s “’Kesh Angels” film showcases the badass women that are breaking gender stereotypes in the Middle East.

Kesh Angels, by Hassan Hajjaj. Courtesy of Taymor Grahne Gallery

Images of Middle Eastern women in the media from the last few decades fall into two stereotypes, either dutiful housewives or victims. This cramped worldview, however, leaves very little room for the reality of their rich and vibrant lives. Moroccan photographer and filmmaker Hassan Hajjaj set out to shatter these misconceptions with his celebrated Kesh Angels series, which debuted in 2014 at the Taymor Grahne Gallery in NYC. Through stunning, technicolor images of Marrakesh’s “girl bike gangs,” he paints a more complex vision of contemporary Islamic gender roles. Now, after spending two more years on an accompanying documentary project, Hajjaj will unveil A Day In The Life Of Karima: A Henna Girl at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), as a major feature of LACMA’s ongoing Islamic Art Now programming. In it he follows one of his favorite “angels” Karima, who is known for breezing through Marrakesh on her bike with her vibrant veils and textile abayas and djabellas fluttering in her wake. In addition to being a local icon, Karima is also a normal woman who works eight or ten hours a day. She is also an artist, wife, mother, and graduate of what Hajjaj calls “Jamaa Fena: the university of street life.”

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