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Antidepressants in U.S. Waterways Giving Fish Anxiety, Homicidal Behavior

Flowing into our rivers and streams, antidepressants from human waste is affecting fish behavior, making them anxious and anti-social.



Among the prescription drugs found in U.S. waterways, antidepressants routinely edge out all other medications discarded or excreted by an increasing percentage of Americans struggling with anxiety disorder.

New research indicates that all that foreign chemistry lining our waterways is having an adverse effect on fish behavior, plaguing them with anxiety, anti-social behavior, and homicidal tendency. The unpublished research, conducted by scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, exposed trace amounts of Prozac to young, developing fathead minnows and recorded the results.

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New Study Finds Solar Panels Are "Contagious"

A new study finds that you're more likely to install solar panels if other people in your zip code have them.


Are you more likely to install solar panels if your neighbor has them? A new study (PDF) out of Stanford says that you are. More specifically, it finds that for every 1 percent increase in the number of installations in a particular zip code, the time until the next adoption of solar decreases by 1 percent. Or, as Vote Solar's Adam Browning put it: Solar is contagious!

So just how quickly can solar power spread as this snowball effect gets rolling? John Farrell of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance's New Rules Project projects the trends forward:

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Last week on Twitter and Facebook, we asked our friends: Can people change themselves? If so, how? We ask a question to our Twitter and Facebook faithful once a day, so if you’re not yet following @GOOD or a fan, make sure to sign up and participate in the conversation.

Check out what our Twitter followers had in mind:

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