GOOD

@GOOD Asks: Should Governments Be Allowed to Track Civilians Through Their Mobile Phones? The Community Answers

@David Russo thinks that it could make sense to track potentially dangerous people like sex offenders. What do you think?

Yesterday on GOOD, Twitter, and Facebook, we asked our friends: Should governments be allowed to track civilians through their mobile phones?

We ask a question to our Twitter and Facebook faithful once a day, so if you’re not yet following @GOOD or a fan, make sure to sign up and participate in the conversation.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles


Beijing cell phone users beware. The Chinese government will be tracking you through mobile use. According to the South China Morning Post this will give the government the ability to watch individuals and gatherings of large groups of people.

We ask a question to our Twitter and Facebook faithful once a day, so if you’re not yet following @GOOD or a fan, make sure to sign up and participate in the conversation.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles

Should Schools Track Truant Kids By GPS?

If Ferris Bueller was a modern student living in Anaheim, California, Principal Rooney could just track him down by GPS.


Ferris Bueller would have had a hard time in Anaheim, California. The city's school district has teamed up with local police for the ultimate Big-Brother-is-watching-you solution to truancy. They've embarked on a six-week pilot program where 75 students with four or more unexcused absences are carrying a handheld GPS tracking device.

Every morning the teens get a robocall reminding them to get to school on time. After that, they're required to pull out their GPS device five times a day and "enter a code that tracks their locations—as they leave for school, when they arrive at school, at lunchtime, when they leave school and at 8 p.m." The kids also get a coach that calls them at least three times a week to help them strategize how to get to class.

Keep Reading Show less
Articles