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10 Tweets From #BlackWomensLivesMatter and #BlackTransLivesMatter You Need To Read

The stories of Tanisha Anderson, Islan Nettles and Aiyana Jones need to be at the forefront of America’s conversation

Why are the most accessible names of black victims in this country those of black men? Well, misogyny, transmisogyny, and homophobia—that’s why. In a society steeped in injustice, it should be intolerable to champion one marginalized population while ignoring another. Many activists agree with this sentiment; just take a look at the #BlackTransLivesMatter and #BlackWomensLivesMatter threads on social media. The stories of Tanisha Anderson, Islan Nettles and Aiyana Jones need to be at the forefront of America’s conversation just as much as those of Mike, Eric and Tamir. To ignore them is a disservice to the movement.

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Are Early Interventions the Key to Ending the Black Male Education Crisis?

Scholars say we need to focus intervention efforts for black boys on pre-K through third grade, but the methods raise plenty of questions.

With only eight percent of black male eighth graders enrolled in schools in urban areas scoring "proficient" on reading tests, and only 10 percent scoring "proficient" in math, intervention programs usually focus on boosting black male middle and high school results and improving high school graduation rates. However, a solution to the black male education crisis offered at a recent symposium held by the Education Testing Service and the Children's Defense Fund suggests a different approach: Reaching young black males when they're much younger—between pre-K and third grade.

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